Citrix Developer Solutions Podcast

S2E1 - "Winning in a Tesla" - Interview with Green Microapp Challenge Team

June 30, 2021 Brick Bridge Consulting Season 2 Episode 1
Citrix Developer Solutions Podcast
S2E1 - "Winning in a Tesla" - Interview with Green Microapp Challenge Team
Show Notes Transcript

Citrix Developer Solutions Podcast
Season 2 Episode 1 - "Winning in a Tesla" - Interview with Green Microapp Challenge Team

This episode is an interview with two-time hackathon champs Alex Edelen and Spencer Dee talk through the process of putting together demos that win. Alex is the Lead Solutions Advisor and Spencer Dee is the Project Manager at Brick Bridge Consulting who both participated in the Fall 2020 Converge Hackathon and the May 2021 Green Microapp Challenge hosted by Citrix. The entries their teams entered went on to win included which included planting an entire forest - you can donate to at: TreeSister.org, do it! Tune in to learn more about the journey from start to finish on winning these awards.
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Show outline:

  1. Ideation
  2. Design
  3. Technical Challenges
  4. Teamwork
  5. Finishing!


Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/brickbridge)

Gil Roberts:

Welcome to the Citrix developer solutions podcast by brick bridge consulting. This podcast is dedicated to design development and implementation of a growing number of citric SAS platforms, as well as some topics around their associated virtualizations product . We'll use this podcast to discuss their own experiences and challenge with SAS platforms, as well as meet interesting people from around the growing Citrix developer community. You're a developer designer, administrator, customer, or agency that uses Citrix products and want the most out of your experience. Then you're in the right spot and should hit that subscribe button and the bell. If there's one of those where you're listening, if you have already thank you so much for your support. Lastly, engage with us. If you have a topic solution, challenge, or message, we want to know about it. Reach out to us via our company pages on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or YouTube. You can also send us a message or Podio chat to service@brickbridgeconsulting.com. Welcome listeners. This is our first episode of season two. I want to introduce a couple of guests with us today. Uh , we have Alex even our lead solution advisor here at brick bridge consulting as well as a two-time award winning hackathon champion and Spencer D our project manager here at brick rich consulting. Also a two time hackathon champion. Uh , both of you gentlemen have won the hackathons , the , uh , converge fall 2020. Uh, I think that was your first. It was. Yeah. And then , uh , more recently the green micro app challenge , uh, which , uh, you guys helped plant a forest in , uh , I believe somewhere in south America, we'll find out it could be in another continent. Uh, today we're just going to have an open discussion about , uh, going through those experiences, what you guys , uh, started with in the beginning. Um , thinking back to last fall , uh, during your first days, and then , uh , moving through just some ideas about how we're doing design and ideation, as well as , uh , kind of the teamwork and then , uh , those crazy finishes on actually getting a video together. So , uh, Alex, I'll kick it to you first. Uh, you started with us roughly , uh, end of August, September of last year, 2020. And we were like, Hey, this workspace product, what did you, what did you think when you first

Alex Edelen:

Saw it? Yeah, so the first, the first time we got into it really was through the micro app certification course , uh, provided by Citrix, which was a great starting point, especially having no background in any of the Citrix SAS products, just kind of diving straight into workspace. And then , um, that has been very beneficial , uh, in working through these hackathons and then now working through production , uh, for client spaces , uh , inside of Citrix workspace. But , uh, you know, really it takes some of those consumer applications, especially on the social media side, like , uh, Instagram and Twitter feeds, and then it builds it into a workflow , uh , automation, software , uh, for business applications. And really I'd never seen anything like that in anywhere else. I had worked previous

Gil Roberts:

Spencer . What did you think when you first encountered workspace? You , you took the same class,

Spencer Dee:

Right ? Right. Yeah. Uh , the class was super helpful. Um, I don't, I don't remember our instructor's name, but he was really good at teaching the material and teaching you how to properly navigate through the micro apps. Um, but yeah, looking at workspace for the first time was definitely like a , a new experience. This was one of my first jobs post college . So I don't, I didn't have a lot of experience doing with CRM softwares and the workspace. Um, and this was, this was definitely one of the cooler ones I've ever encountered, just the feed and everything like that, and all the different integrations that are possible. And when

Gil Roberts:

You guys started with us, you didn't have any Citrix experience

Alex Edelen:

At all. Correct? Right. Yup .

Gil Roberts:

So , uh , with, with it starting, we , we knew that the converged hackathon was coming and we, we wanted to be able to come up with some great ideas early on , uh, so that we could do some research and be ready for when the hackathon started. What was that ideation process like? Yeah, I think

Alex Edelen:

Most of it, you know, we started with some conversations, you know, in the mornings drinking our first cup of coffee in the office. We'd kick around some ideas, Hey, this would be pretty cool if we could do that. Um, and some of those ideas are pretty abstract. And then , uh , eventually you get out the whiteboard and start building out a model and a plan and designing how there , how all these separate ideas from many of our different developers and employees, how they could all come together in one picture and tie everything in from , uh , you know, LinkedIn to Spotify in New York times.

Spencer Dee:

Yeah. The process of , um, figuring out what stuff we wanted to integrate. We literally just went through and it's like, what is something that we use every day? I remember when we were trying to think of the ideation process, I would just go through my phone, look at all the different apps that I would utilize and main Spotify, LinkedIn, all those different apps for something I was using every day. And I was like, wow, that'd be really cool. If you could just bring that into the workspace, to where people wouldn't have to use different platforms all the time. Okay . I

Gil Roberts:

Remember when we were talking about the initial ideas that we kept it wide open for a reason, and we knew that people do more than just work right inside of these spaces, that when , when, when somebody's physically there , uh , at their job, that there's , there's more than just, you know , robotically working for eight hours that people do check their social media , uh , either on the desktop or more famously on their own phone, they're in the office, regardless of what the employer's desire of something like that happening, you know, it's , it's in reality, it's going to happen anyway. It's almost impossible not to. Right. So w we felt that maybe bringing that into the workspace environment and at least controlling the distraction, right. Like knowing what they're going to be doing, and then possibly like with New York times using that to the employer's advantage by presenting them industry topics or things that they would be able to at least have some, some level of business purpose for. Well , when you guys started designing the micro apps in the space, obviously you had training. How did you feel about the, the approach to that low code? No code editor that workspace?

Spencer Dee:

Um, it definitely took a couple like a week or like a couple of weeks walking through it and playing with all the different systems, you know, going through misconfigured systems. Um, we, we had some systems or some integrations built from previous hackathons where I could kind of go through that and just kind of see how layouts worked. Um, but at the start, I mean, it , it's, it's a little difficult. Um, because during the, during the training classes, you know, you have a PDF file that walks you through how to complete all the different tasks. And without, without having that crutch at first, it takes a little bit of getting used to it . So it was a bit of a learning curve, but once you got over that learning curve, how did you feel about it now?

Alex Edelen:

Yeah , it's , uh , it's once you get the hang of it, it's very straightforward . Uh, it leaves you room to design the apps , uh, and the interfaces as you would like, or as your team or customers would like. So there is, there's , there's both the structure , uh , and the flexibility to make it a productive, but also your own. Uh, and once you get through, you know , a couple of trial and errors, it's very straightforward and you can kinda run through it pretty quickly. And I think that second hackathon, the green app challenge, we really started to hit our stride and we were able to knock things out much in a much quicker timeframe.

Gil Roberts:

Yeah. So it'd be able to pick up more functionality. I think what we probably suffered most for on , on the converge hackathon was designed like the beautification side of it, just because we were putting a lot of things in technically, right? Yeah , absolutely. So , uh, the second time we , we definitely had more focus. There was a theme, a very explicit theme. So we're able to focus more on getting the applications integrated and then making it look great. Um, unfortunately Queena couldn't join us today, but her wendy.com that just looked at it looks , yeah ,

Alex Edelen:

Beautiful. The embed on that map looks phenomenal. We just,

Spencer Dee:

Just, we have more time, you know , um, with our, with our converge hackathon , a lot of our hackathon team, it was our first experience with Citrix products in general. I think so hall might've been the only experience Citrix developer on , on the team. And then when we got to this eco-friendly one , um, most of us had already had a lot of experience.

Gil Roberts:

It feels that once you, once you get the hang of it, it gets a lot easier. Yeah . So similar to the podium product, both of you guys have had time after the first hackathon to actually get some mileage in Podio. So usually , uh , here at brick bridge , people start out on Podio and then we move them into other Citrix products. You guys came in directly on workspace. So as compared to Podio, how do you all see the two products when it comes to actually designing and doing implementation inside of them?

Alex Edelen:

Uh, the workspace side definitely gives you more flexibility on the user interface. Um, Podio is very, and in its current state is kind of what you see is what you get on the interface. So I love that about workspace, where you have more room to play, where things are what's , the user is going to see on their end. And oh , even since converge , they've added even more features to that interface and what you can do with it. So , um, you know, Podio is pretty quick. Workspace takes a little bit more , uh , to get that design done, but there are that's because there are more options for that interface.

Gil Roberts:

You're going to get more return on the design investment. Podia is much more rigid. W

Spencer Dee:

How do you feel? Well , I mean, with my limited , uh, I've , uh , probably had some limited Podio development experience. Um, however, I, I do think , um, it could be an effective system of record for workspace in the future almost to where I can use Podio as a backend function to display and workspace. What exactly are basically Podio tasks will come to you and workspace to where you don't have to go out

Gil Roberts:

And seek . Yeah. I know that there's a more user learning curve over on Podio. Uh, you know, it has its quirks and other things that would be , uh, not as easy to pick up as a user, a little easier from a developer standpoint to get applications out, but a little harder for the , the end user to actually digest, or it's almost like the flip side in workspace where it's more user-focused. And then , um , a little more technical, especially , uh , w actually was dive into that a little bit, just some of the technicals on the workspace side, when, when you're working in a micro app and you're adding an API integration, just explain that a little bit for people that may not have, have seen the backside of workspace.

Spencer Dee:

It's 90% of it is analyzing a certain API docs that are given to you for the certain integration, because every, every different integration has a different way that it comes into the workspace. So, I mean, get hub in New York times have totally different ways that you , you bring it into the workspace and you call the API APIs . It's , it's all API doc dependent.

Gil Roberts:

The documentation can be good or bad, right . Depending on the other side of the bridge workspace, it, at least from that side, it seems to be the same, right. It's going to have that same methodology, but depending on what your integrating, right. It could be a very different experience.

Spencer Dee:

Yeah. I mean, I will say the workspace is really flexible and getting, and being able to bring in different integrations. So like the different API docs will be brought into the workspace in a lot of different ways and workspace allows for you to bring it in and all those different ways. Would it be

Gil Roberts:

Fair to say Alex, that it's, it's really the challenge in workspace technically depends on what you're actually trying to bring into workspace, not workspaces.

Alex Edelen:

Yeah, absolutely. I know , um, you know, LinkedIn, for example, had hundreds of pages, it seems like of different features and things you could do. So it was narrowing down what we wanted to do specifically , um, and kind of not getting lost down the rabbit hole of hundreds and hundreds of different features, but keeping it on task to what we needed it to do. And then hopefully building out something more robust later on down the road, but workspace will let you do just about anything it's up to you to figure out what you need it to do.

Gil Roberts:

Yeah . Contrast that with like toggle . I think that was a little, little more difficult. I think, I think they've, they've upgraded since we've done that fall hackathon , but it , at least initially it was,

Spencer Dee:

Yeah. The issue with toggle was, is one. They were like updating the API docs , um , consistently throughout the, throughout the demo process or not the demo process throughout the process of us creating the integration, which made it really difficult to, you know, properly make calls and properly bring it into the system because I feel like every week I'd go on there and see toggle and it'd be misconfigured after not touching it. And it's just like, well, they're , they're changing their API documentation all the time, which is a challenge in itself. Would

Gil Roberts:

You say that , uh, that, that brings up a good point. Would you say that , um, there's some maintenance that's going to be required for these workspace systems? So partners doing implementations have an opportunity , uh , for servicing on that side, or it seems like it could be easy enough that a lot of organizations could DIY after maybe a partner implements.

Spencer Dee:

I feel like it'd be, it'd be possible to DIY. Um, you'd have to make sure that the P the company that you give the workspace to , or like the integration student know all the documentations and are familiar with everything before they have that feature. Yeah .

Alex Edelen:

I think if an organization sent a couple employees and their it departments through kind of the same training program, Spencer and I, and our team had, I think they could handle the maintenance on an ongoing , um, schedule and maybe even get to the point where they could do their own integrations once you get used to it. Um, it it's very straightforward . I don't agree with that.

Gil Roberts:

Focusing back on the hackathon. Uh, I know there's a lot of teamwork cause there's a lot of crossover, people are in the same account. Let's , let's talk about the hackathon experience first converge, and then what we did with the , uh, we're going to get to the Tesla. Okay . We got to talk about that. Uh, but just kinda like, kind of contrast the two when it came down to the team, the teamwork and how, how people work together as a team on a workspace implementation.

Spencer Dee:

Yeah. So it was a little different. So for converge the first time I was, I was just a regular developer on that one. Um, it was a lot of me and Alex Davis collaborating together to work on. Um, it was really the , uh, like the New York times, the get hub , the Spotify, the ones that make work more enjoyable apps. Um, and it was really just us getting together. Anytime we had an air, we'd just put our brains together and try and resolve it. There's a little different from the eco challenge to where a lot of it was queen , uh , working on the certain integrations. And then if she had issues, she'd come back to us. Whereas she was doing a lot of the legwork . Okay. Yeah . I

Alex Edelen:

Think for both, we had , um, kind of paired compartmentalization. So we had , uh, two people working on , um , a few different apps together and so that they would , uh, be able to cohesively work through those. And then we had another group working on some other ones and then we had , uh, for converged specifically, so hall was kind of overseeing the entire project and how tied together. So I think that worked well because so hall had the experience with workspace where everybody else on the converged team was pretty new to it , um, can translate to the green challenge. Uh , we had all come in with a decent amount of either direct workspace , uh, experience or , um, experience with API integrations, with other products like Podio. And so we were able to kind of flow through that green challenge pretty quickly as an overall team, without having to do nearly as much compartmentalization and oversight.

Spencer Dee:

Sorry, I do want to add that so hall , it was really integral to that all converge. I mean, without him, it would've been a mess.

Gil Roberts:

And just for listeners that may not know the history, he was our April, 2020 winner on the business value category. And he basically did that solo and my name's on there, but , you know, I'm just the , um , I'm just a pretty face, so it's not a good one at that either, but the , um , yeah, he , he definitely did most of that lift with the , uh , smartphone , uh , integration, I think was really what set that off. Not being able to send , uh , receive phone calls , uh , right there inside the workspace , uh , experience. Um, but yeah , yeah, he's definitely, definitely got to give him a shout out for, for his efforts in , in both of those now he wasn't as involved in the green challenge. Right.

Spencer Dee:

So for the green challenge, like I was kinda mentioning earlier , um, I kinda , me and Alex Davis kind of took on that role a little bit to where we were putting out a lot of the fires and kind of helping with issues to where so hall was doing that for the fall, the fall challenge. Cause we , we had that workspace experience from the full challenge so we could take

Gil Roberts:

It and use it. I think that displays a great kind of promotional path for partners or organizations that are looking at investing in their talent, kind of how that, that path looks technically. And from a teamwork perspective that once some team members go through either a hackathon or customer implementation or, you know , extended training and demoing that they're , they're able to go back and internally train and support others that are coming in. So yeah , it's always interesting with these new , um, software sets, cause there's not a lot of training out there right away. Right. And then obviously they're new. So there's not a lot of experience there either. So being able to have organizational learning versus personal learning is important because companies have to take a risk on training into products that don't have a lot of adoption yet. And do I have to keep paying lots for training? And the good news is with workspace and it's similar to Podio. Uh, you don't have to, you know, you can actually get a few people through training. We recommend the training at some point, but there's , there's an ability for that organization to have individuals pass that to new people.

Spencer Dee:

Yeah. Once you get the hang of it, it is, it's pretty straightforward .

Gil Roberts:

So a bit of a learning curve in the beginning, obviously what integration you're trying to integrate with how well that we've discussed, how well their documentation is, how well , uh, that thing plays well with others. Um, that can be a bit of a challenge, but once you, once you have workspace under the belt, it becomes pretty process-oriented on getting more integration.

Alex Edelen:

Yeah. And I th I think where the hackathons , the micro app challenges, I think they're great experiences to begin with either you're not spending time and money on your clients' accounts, testing, things out new people can dive in with, you know, very little repercussions, if things go wrong, you know , you might not win, but that's about as much as it costs you to , to get into these things. So it's , I think that was very beneficial for our dive into workspaces , being able to test things out , um, you know , no idea was too crazy for that fall converge one , uh , and just seeing how it all comes together. And then now we have months of experience on workspace that we can take to the client space .

Gil Roberts:

Yeah. I can't recommend participating in the hackathons enough. I mean, it gives a goal, there's like a deadline. So you get that project feel that implementation like real , uh , real bullets kind of feel , uh, so that can't , again, can't recommend that not , uh , pat Patterson and the group over at Citrix. And we got to tip our hat to them. They've really opened up a lot of opportunities for us and others out there by having these hackathons . It's also a great investment into marketing, right? Because you can, you can get a demo video that you can show the clients. We've used our hackathon videos multiple times to show off functionality and just kind of get people to know it's a new category of software. So to get people, to , to see what the possibility is, even if it's not what they're particularly looking for, you know, it's, it's pretty hard to explain workspace. I have to be honest, it's a difficult product to explain, but once people see it, it clicks very rapidly, right? It's very, a very visually learned piece of software , uh , to end clients. Um , so having those hackathon demos has been a great asset. So you get, you get multiple returns on investment , uh , that can eventually lead to monetization if you're a partner. Um , it's just a wonderful way to , uh, to give training as well , uh, with a goal, you know , there's an end goal of mine and , and hopefully you win. Uh , we , we do a lot of winning , uh , that that's probably not going to last forever, but , uh, you know, it's one of those things where we, we, we invest the effort into it. You know , we, we pull people off of projects. We take time, we honestly, we pay people our rally while it's going on. So we, we want them to focus on it and we always rotate team members so that the experiences is spread around. So very good. Okay. We got to talk Tesla, how cool was that free suite ?

Alex Edelen:

It was a lot of fun. I think it , uh, something we kicked around, like how cool would it be? And then when the green micro app challenge, when the theme came out, we were like , this is set up perfectly

Gil Roberts:

Electric vehicle. You can't get better than a Tesla right now. And , uh, you know, I , I w so, so our process was on that is actually when we , we came up the idea, it was a little early on, and then the thing came out. We're like, oh man, that's, that's perfect. But we didn't know if it was going to work . Like if workspace was going to work on a Tesla. So we actually went to Touro and got a local Tesla and we just play with it . It was you and I mostly Spencer, we just kind of played with it for a couple hours, returned it , um, send

Spencer Dee:

Notifications, see if that rendered,

Gil Roberts:

You know, just make sure it just didn't look awful. Right. As an experience. And we had seen in some of the , uh, I had done a little bit of research and some of the user forums where people were using the old storefront and the old version of workspace, and they were trying to get it to work inside Teslas. Um, you know, there's that big, beautiful tablet there, but much to our, I wouldn't say surprise, but the light , I looked beautiful. There's plenty of real estate on that tablet to half the tablet is , is like the car's functionality. It's kind of important. Cause you're in a car you might be driving. Right . So , uh , very important for that to happen. Uh, but the other side of that tablet is functional , uh , and through the web browser. So you use the website of the , uh, the software and the Tesla , uh, to be able to get into workspace and it worked, and there was plenty of real estate and look beautiful. You guys can see the videos , uh , functioned. Well, and that was on , uh , we use the 4g connection. We didn't connect the car to wifi. We wanted it in a native kind of state. Uh, so as long as you have that 4g connection, you can, you can do it. And on it. Now this was to our surprise Spencer, when we drove it around, it's still worth and it's still worth , oddly enough, it'll cut the audio. Yeah.

Spencer Dee:

That was weird. I was , that was kind of indescribable, but yeah ,

Gil Roberts:

Yeah , yeah. If a car is in motion, it won't play any audio. You can play music in the car, but through the web browser won't play any audio, but it would play video, which you think that

Spencer Dee:

Would be. Yeah . When we were driving, we could play that captain planet video, but none of the audio would come out as , I mean, it was weird, but you got to expect that when you're trying to play with workspace in a car, yeah. The

Gil Roberts:

Primary tasks should be driving. Hopefully not at least

Alex Edelen:

Off or the automatic, driving's all fleshed out. And then we can just run workspace during the day .

Gil Roberts:

Right. You can go ahead and knock out some work. Uh, I think that was kind of our original intention. We wanted to do some fun stuff. We showed off a couple little work things, but w we really wanted to use the car to its full capabilities. The , uh, another surprise, the beautiful surprise that we got was, again, coined as a windy weather API, where you can actually pinch and zoom in on the maps and scroll. That was pretty cool. That, that, that hit right. So, I mean, it was good. It was really good. So we w we didn't expect that we did try to launch a virtual desktop, which is not in the video. You'll see, in the video where the desktop icons, there , there are some limitations to the Tesla. Obviously there's an ICA file that has to be downloaded. And , uh , I think there's some other methods, but we just ran out of time to , to continue to explore, but it tests the tablet. It doesn't want to download files. Right. Like, and which for, for obvious reasons, you want to put a virus in a car and then having , you know , especially one that goes like zero to 60, in less than two seconds.

Spencer Dee:

I do remember it also had some issues like pulling up separate browser. Yeah . Yes.

Gil Roberts:

I , that , that's a good point. Um , so if you want to pop like a pop-up so that that's just not , uh , the browser itself has configured to belong . Who knows ? We can get

Spencer Dee:

A Ilan on the podcast. Seafood answers your question .

Gil Roberts:

Love to have him on here. He probably doesn't know who we are, but not yet , at least . Yeah. So we'll , we'll see. What's , uh, we'll see. What's up with that. Uh, in a future episode, that'd be great. Um, but I was so pleased with the way initially it turned

Alex Edelen:

Out it's got great practical applications, because most people's complaint about the EVs currently in their current state is, well, it takes a half an hour to charge. So you schedule a charging and a work session. You go pull in and you don't have to take your computer or iPad with you. You pull in, plug it in, pop, open your tab, fire up workspace, and knock out some work. And then, you know, you're done with your charging and can go about your

Gil Roberts:

Day. Right . I got a half-hour with super productive. So you're by yourself, right?

Spencer Dee:

Except some expense reports, you know, you can do whatever,

Gil Roberts:

All the things, right. And just, and based on the implementation that, that person's experiencing, it should be set up to where they could probably have one or two hours worth of productivity during that charge people returning to work. This is a great excuse. Hey, you have this in your car. Why don't you go out, grab a cup of coffee, go sit at the charging station, mid work to get out of the office and just kill some work. Right. You have beautiful audio . So if you need to take some meetings, you can do that in the car because you also have all the cars , functionality outside of workspace. Yep . That's a great interplay. Obviously you have your phone, but you can leave the computer.

Spencer Dee:

Yeah. One thing I was hoping we could do with that was launched zoom directly from there and have it launch a meeting. Um ,

Gil Roberts:

We're gonna calls , I think we can do. I think that'll be helpful, like with smartphone , uh you're right on the zoom. It wants to pop a window. And that's where that , that when that kind of pop up , limitation pops in, again, that's a security hole. Right . So that's why they have it plugged up, but for good reason. Right. So , um, yeah. Wonderful , wonderful visual representation.

Spencer Dee:

That definitely would not want my car to get hacked. No,

Gil Roberts:

No. Especially if you're just trying to drive to McDonald's or something like that, and all of a sudden, it just takes you off and takes you off somewhere. That's no good. It's really hard to explain that to the police. Well, let's wrap this episode up with the finish. So I know it's always, like, we always have these two stages to our hackathons where it's like 90% set up and really the deliverables, the video. Right. So we have shooting where we shoot the actual video. So we , we got the Tesla again. We'll talk about that because I think that's a little more interesting because we extended, what we did for the converge fall converge was, was what we did on the desktop side of the video. Very similar. But with the Tesla, it was, is a whole nother ball game. Right. Cause we have like live action that had to occur. It's very different than, than screen-share videos.

Spencer Dee:

Video is me in the back seat , just pointing on my laptop, trying to make sure all the notifications were going. Yeah,

Gil Roberts:

It was w w I think we, that shoot, I think I famously said like, oh, this will be like a half hour or something like that. And everything that could go wrong, went wrong right there at the very

Spencer Dee:

Laptop died.

Gil Roberts:

We couldn't get there with some loading issues that we had . Yeah . We had to hard reset the entire car. At one point we

Alex Edelen:

Worked through them all, but yes. Got

Gil Roberts:

Like two hours, I think. Is you went through all the challenges. Yeah, it was , uh , it was definitely interesting , um, to do that live action video, we had like this nice gimbal , of course, the battery died on that because we were using it the test all day. So it's like me holding the phone is steady as I possibly could in there. And then of course, in a live action video editing as much more difficult than screenshot video editing. So just give us the Oscar. Yeah . It was just so it was so much more difficult than, than expected now that we know. Uh , that'll , that'll be different in the future. How do we, how do we top a Tesla? I don't know , space X space. We get a rocket ship. Yeah. Get one , get on top of, one of the Falcons in there and then have them , like one of the astronauts, like knocking out some expense reports and some PTO requests.

Alex Edelen:

Yeah . Take a vacation after a space . Space-wise

Spencer Dee:

You get the, get the truck. Yeah.

Gil Roberts:

The cyber truck, or they produced those yet. I know the factories about

Alex Edelen:

How about now ? Next year too . It's the chip shortage. Yeah . That stuff was you figure on this . It was a cyber truck.

Gil Roberts:

We're just keep asking you, buddy . Um, yeah, the F the finish is always, always interesting to these. And we had another interesting finish for the June , uh , Mia hackathon with our high school team that is not out yet, actually at the time of this recording, it's still going on. So , uh , for injuries , uh, but it's , uh, that that's coming down to an interesting finish as well. So , um, I'll give them a , I'll give them a quick plug. As we wrap up here, we do have our first, all high school team . So they've been in workspace for a total of three weeks, and they're about to submit a hack-a-thon entry . They're naturals.

Alex Edelen:

Yeah , they did great. Yeah . Yeah .

Gil Roberts:

From what, yeah . From the , uh, the early cuts that we have here , um, yeah, it looks pretty good. I obviously they're , they're brand new and they're super new to just technology in general. So I'm excited to be able to present what that looks like and how we, how our organizational learning can be shared even to people that are brand new into the, into the industry. Uh, and, and really it's going show the capabilities of anybody can learn workspace, right? It doesn't matter who you are.

Alex Edelen:

I love them . I love their perspective on workspace too , coming from an educational, you know, that's their experience more so than the business world that we came to it through. So some of their apps and some of the things they thought through , uh, were much different and pretty neat , um, and great applications for the product.

Gil Roberts:

We're going to catch up with them a little teaser here. We're going to catch up with them on the next podcast too, to really, this will give a wonderful perspective, zero to workspace. Cause they're , they're literally first it jobs, you know, some of them are juniors becoming seniors after the summer Scott , their driver's license. Yeah, that's correct. We got some that are, that are just graduating. So we've got a couple of seniors that just graduated a couple of juniors , uh , moving into their senior year. So we really wanted to show everyone in our listeners , uh , in the Citrix community, that it is possible to add this to your implementation routine. So if you're heavily into virtualization, are you heavily into Podio or some of these other SAS products don't sleep on this. This is a , it is outside of a small learning curve at the beginning, and just understanding what you're integrating it is possible. Um, and it does help resolve a lot of complaints if you're one of the one Podio partners out there , uh, when , when people complain about usability or user interface, this is a kind of a silver bullet for that. It's also very affordable. So get with your Citrix rep or, or with us. Uh, we , we have , uh , partner licensing available through us as well. So just reach out if you have any questions. Thank you, Alex. Thank you, Spencer for joining today. We'll probably have you guys on one more time in the season. Um, I know we got a webinar coming up that you two will be on. That's going to be on July 29th , uh, scheduled for 12, 15 Eastern time. You can register at our website , uh, brick bridge consulting.com. That's B R I C K B R I D G E. consulting.com. You'll see a, a strip on the website that says register here for the webinar would love to have you attend. These gentlemen would love to have you attend. Elan told me he's maybe. Oh , [inaudible] Very strong. Maybe. Yeah. I wish we were in touch. Yeah. His people are talking to our people. He's talking to his people. Right . Um, I think that's it. So listeners, thank you so much. Welcome to the new season, first episode in the can and on the books and in your ears , um, do like, and subscribe to us. We we'd love to have you on , uh, and learning with us and, and understanding our experiences and our journey as well as , uh , sharing the information. So hit us up on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. What else about forgotten Spencer Tik TOK. Pinterest. Yeah, I think we got our new space. I space friends there for those that room. Remember that one, if you're old enough, but tell my age there. But yeah, there's a there's lot of ways that you can engage in the show. We love getting questions and comments that throw in our team, our experts. Uh , again, the next episode, we'll go over one more hackathon content . There's just a lot going on may, June, July, and I think there's another one in Citrix development focus going on those months, we'll have a little more hacked on content slides. Make sure you subscribe. We'll have more content related to virtualization as well as some care files on a few episodes. So thank you so much for listening and have a great rest of your day, wherever you are . Thanks. Okay .