Podio Solutions Podcast

S1E5 - Interview with Jordan Fleming of Game Changers & smrtPhone & the Supercharged! podcast

February 11, 2019 Brick Bridge Consulting Season 1 Episode 5
Podio Solutions Podcast
S1E5 - Interview with Jordan Fleming of Game Changers & smrtPhone & the Supercharged! podcast
Chapters
Podio Solutions Podcast
S1E5 - Interview with Jordan Fleming of Game Changers & smrtPhone & the Supercharged! podcast
Feb 11, 2019 Season 1 Episode 5
Brick Bridge Consulting

Show Outline:

  1. Introduction to interview
  2. Topic: – Interview with Jordan Fleming of Game Changers
  3. 1st Discussion: Jordan's upcoming Podcast, “Supercharged! with Jordan Fleming” [http://wearegamechangers.com/en/podcast/] *HINT: SUBSCRIBE*
  4. 2nd Discussion: Game Changers [wearegamechangers.com] and its business philosophy and history
  5. Shop Talk: Jarett and Alex dive into some "shop talk" with Jordan about Podio solution design and two big sticking points when working with clients.
  6. 3rd Discussion: smrtPhone [smrtPhone.io] -- its history with swiftpod.io, the explosive growth in users (especially in the REI space), and the new “smrtDialer” product add-on.
  7. Audience Engagement: Solving Podio Gaps – Podio Developers and Power users – Submit your gaps!
  8. Outro: SUBSCRIBE and Thank you.

Follow us on social media (@PodcastPodio) to stay up to date on all Podio Podcast news.

*** Note: interview contains some loose language ***


Support the show (http://www.brickbridgeconsulting.com/podcast)

Show Notes Transcript

Show Outline:

  1. Introduction to interview
  2. Topic: – Interview with Jordan Fleming of Game Changers
  3. 1st Discussion: Jordan's upcoming Podcast, “Supercharged! with Jordan Fleming” [http://wearegamechangers.com/en/podcast/] *HINT: SUBSCRIBE*
  4. 2nd Discussion: Game Changers [wearegamechangers.com] and its business philosophy and history
  5. Shop Talk: Jarett and Alex dive into some "shop talk" with Jordan about Podio solution design and two big sticking points when working with clients.
  6. 3rd Discussion: smrtPhone [smrtPhone.io] -- its history with swiftpod.io, the explosive growth in users (especially in the REI space), and the new “smrtDialer” product add-on.
  7. Audience Engagement: Solving Podio Gaps – Podio Developers and Power users – Submit your gaps!
  8. Outro: SUBSCRIBE and Thank you.

Follow us on social media (@PodcastPodio) to stay up to date on all Podio Podcast news.

*** Note: interview contains some loose language ***


Support the show (http://www.brickbridgeconsulting.com/podcast)

Gil Roberts:

Welcome to the podio solutions podcast. Season One, episode five. Got a special episode today. I'm going to do a quick introduction here. We have Jordan Fleming from game changers and uh, of the smart and also on the smartphone collaboration. Uh, I'm Gill Roberts and also on this call with Jordan today is going to be Alex show , our lead developer and Jared Duker, our principal consultant. Uh , this podcast is about the design and development on the Citrix podio platform found at podio.com po dio dot com. We use this podcast to discuss our own experience with podio as well as interesting topics from podio's developer community. If you are a podio designer, developer or working at an agency, small business or enterprise, and then you should immediately hit that subscribe button. If you have already, thank you so much for your support. Lastly, before we dive into this interview today, if you have a topic, issues, solution, problem, anything else you would like to discuss, we want to know. So hit us up on Facebook, linkedin, Twitter, or send us an email or podio message to podcast at brick bridge, consulting.com. That's B R I C K B R I d g e consulting.com. All right. Without further ado, let's get into our interview with Jordan Fleming of game changers. This is a great, great interview . So excited to share with you guys. Thanks Jordan. Appreciate you coming onto our podcast. I know you have a podcast that's coming out and that's going to be coming out on Monday. Is that right?

Jordan Felming:

Uh , I believe so. We've already recorded , um, I think about this week. We've done seven episodes. Okay . So we're going to release the first sort of three or four next week and then , uh , it's going to be weekly after that. So I'm hoping next week, Monday

Gil Roberts:

and uh, for , uh, for our audience, where can they find your podcast right now?

Jordan Felming:

Uh, it is going to be up on apple. We're just waiting for their authorization, you know, that whole process. And , um, it's going to be up on apple. It's already up on Spotify. Uh , it will be up on Google, but because I'm actually in Poland right now, they're having a geographic block. Um, yeah. Which I didn't realize. So I'm gonna wait, Google may come in a couple of weeks when I travel to the UK or to the u s and uh, and I, and I then go back to them and say, okay, how about now? Uh , but you'll be able to find them there. And of course we also have a page on our website with all the , uh , episodes , uh, there as well.

Gil Roberts:

Excellent. And now you , uh , your company Game Changers , uh , that's going to be located at, we are game changers.com. Um

Jordan Felming:

hmm .

Gil Roberts:

And I have the podcast, you guys going to have the podcast up there. I know when we first initially started talking, we saw your announcement of your podcast . Uh , we were about to launch our podcast as well, so kinda two at once. So we were joking. Great minds think alike, right? So let's talk about , uh, obviously our listeners know a little bit about our content. Um , now we've gotten a few episodes out. Let's talk about what type of content you guys are going to have on your podcast.

Jordan Felming:

Yeah , so uh, I'm focusing our podcast really strictly on interviewing people. Uh, the usually around , uh, you know, somewhere between 25 and 35 minute long podcasts. Uh, nothing really longer than that. Um, so that you can, you can have a , a quick hit on a weekly basis. And , um , there are basically three types of podcasts we're doing. Um, number one, we're talking to podio partners , uh , different podium partners around the world who , uh, you know, they've got different views on , uh, on Podio, on how to integrate podio. They've got stories about what's good, what's bad, they've got products, et cetera . Number two, we're talking to the add ons and the product people, so people who have built , um, either po official podio add ons or who have integrated other systems and have a product to do that , um, or who have built products , um, using podio. So , uh , you know, build products on top of podio. And then finally we're talking to actual people, customers. So , uh , we're talking to, to companies who aren't partners, they're not integrators, they're just companies who use podio in their day to day life and really try to learn from them, you know, from people like they get their story get. Um, what was it like to get involved with podio? Uh, what were the challenges? What were the things that worked well? I think that gives people a really good sense of, of, of where they can go with podio. So those are the three things that we're focused on.

Gil Roberts:

That's fantastic. Especially like that last part about the client's stories that you guys are going to cover. I think one of the things that we , we've dove into in a couple of episodes that that's really important is the design aspect. I know a lot of us like to get under the hood and get into the details, but sometimes that the design requirements that clients need is just so important and it really shapes that user experience of obviously we get, we get to piggyback off of Podio is great interface, but you know how we design things where , where the fields go I think sometimes get lost on the technical side. So , um, I noticed something else on your guys' websites. You guys do some, I'm focusing on game changers here real quickly. Tell us about what kind of services that you guys have there. And I love how you guys have bespoke systems and uh , one more comment. I believe that's a, a Aston Martin or, a Bentley on the front page there.

Jordan Felming:

It's a , yeah , it's a Bentley. It's a Bentley. It's not a bad looking car. Um, uh , yeah, so I mean game changers , you know, so game changes has been going as a company for 14 years. And uh, I started at sort of, you know, the classic out of your bedroom. And , um, uh, about seven ago we found podio and about four years ago, we seriously decided that this is it for us. And, you know, and , and really the company has been skyrocketing. We've got now team and you know, in Asia, in Europe and North America and we've got companies in, in Europe , uh, well, Europe , uh , UK and America. Um, and we've got clients in about 16 countries now. Um, you know, everything from government agencies down to, you know, subway sandwiches is one of our clients , um, uh, oil and gas companies right down to mom and pop, like, you know, two man band, one man band companies. And , um, you know, we , we really focus on , um , the kind of change management and management consultancy side of designing podio where you're going in and you're really investigating the business so that you can understand how they work, understand how they're suffering from maybe existing systems and design a process and a podio architecture that is going to maximize.

Alex Shull:

Yeah . That is a really impressive spread of clients that you're able to serve. And it really speaks not only to the great attitude you have about being able to solve problems with the flexibility of Podio to be able to apply to all of those different situations. It's really , um , remarkable. And I think we, you know, you're in a company with , um, people who think very, very similarly about what the power of Podio is and the right way to get people to understand the value that it can provide.

Jordan Felming:

Absolutely. I mean, from what I've seen of your guys' work and, and we'll listen to your podcast . I think the mindsets mindset's very similar. And, you know, we've just been really lucky in , um, you know, we've, we've been expanding the team and we've been very lucky at getting involved with a lot of great organizations around the world and , um, and being, and as you pointed out, the power, the flexibility and power of podio to be anything to anyone anywhere is, is just unbelievable. Yeah. Yeah. These are all great points. Have you, let's talk about something, I know that we've found a lot of different ways to apply. Have you found anything that it hasn't excelled at? Uh, and it just didn't, didn't fire off. Only I'll be honest, only where the two times it doesn't fire in my opinion, the two, the scenarios and we've like anyone, we've had projects that have been amazing, but we've also had projects that haven't , right? Like nobody bats a thousand. Nobody bats a hundred percent. We, we have had our top times where we've have challenges and , and what matters is how you address them. I'm , I'm happy to say we usually are able to address those very well. I would say where we don't find it working is number one where we don't get the buy in from the full executive. Um, it, you know, of course when we, when we approach a customer , um, I always say to the executive team, I need your 100% buy in . Not because I'm going to do everything through you. Because the truth is you guys don't know anything. I'm going to work with your employees. But if you're not the one, if you're not bought into this and you're not championing it, we're dead. Right. That's number one. And the second time , um, is where we have allowed clients , um , me , I hope it doesn't happen much anymore, but where we have allowed things to be over complicated when we, what we really should have done is simplified them. Jared, I'm sure you have. Trying not to laugh too hard.

Gil Roberts:

Yeah. And Jordan, Jared is our, he's our principal consultant and designers. So he , he probably feels that a right at heart , uh , with what you're saying there. So

Jarett Duker:

yeah, you're speaking definite truth right now. Um, change management is a very difficult thing to orchestrate throughout an organization and without strong buy in from senior leadership and their vision, even if they don't know exactly where the train is headed is absolutely critical and controlling complexity. It is so easy to create just spider webbing, app architectures , uh , so quickly. And if you don't design well from the beginning to anticipate , uh , expanding complexity, you can just get yourself into such a mess so incredibly quickly. So it's , it's really nice to hear someone else feels my pain.

Gil Roberts:

Hey

Alex Shull:

Jordan, I wanted to ask you a question related to that. Um, do you practice a, an, an agile methodology or anything along those lines in terms of the way you deal with gathering requirements and , um , delivering , um , updates and things like that?

Jordan Felming:

Um, kind of , um, I, you know, my background, Jesus , my background is as a professional musician. Um, so I'm not going to pretend , um , you know, I'm not gonna pretend like I have any sort of uh, massive training in , in project management or anything like that. What we've found is , um, you know, I, my background in terms of businesses has always been, my strength is going into places and analyzing the businesses and figuring out what sucks, what needs to be fixed and how to do it, right. That's, that's what, and it translates well with podio. Um, and you know, and then we have developed a methodology for tracking projects, for updating clients, for uh, putting, you know, and we , we continue to evolve that. But it is not a , a defined like off the shelf , um, agile process that you might , uh, see people trained in.

Alex Shull:

I understand. So it sounds like you have some of the principles that you use because you know how beneficial they are. But when you interact with a client within that engagement at the beginning, you kind of make sure that you have a process that fits their needs specifically. So you don't force them or pigeonhole them into a single way of doing things. But your principles are pretty standard and you apply them over and over. Does that sound right?

Jordan Felming:

Yeah , we have a defined way of running every custom project. Um , we have a defined way. We go through a a to a two to three week business analysis and business needs scope um, process first where we, um, usually two days on site where we rip apart the whole business and talk to everybody. And then we create a , what we call a business needs scope, which is a non technical document that outlines what this phase of work has to accomplish from a business point of view. Forget technical, forget systems, forget integrations. What do we need to accomplish from a business perspective? Um, that gets signed off. And then that really is the Holy Bible we use in our, we , we go through then a process of a two week process of system design where we , um, where we lay out how we want to do things. And then usually , uh , anywhere a four that a to eight week build and um, you know, process where we're doing a rapid prototyping , getting things built quickly and then automating them. And then you're looking at a ,

Jarett Duker:

uh, uh,

Jordan Felming:

data migration testing and training process after that. And it's standard across every custom system we do now.

Jarett Duker:

That's great. That's great.

Gil Roberts:

So let's a , the speaking of the systems, let's, let's dive into a product that , that we know and love and actually use it and have used with some of our client installation, especially over in the Rei world. I know that's kind of where it started, which is smart phone , uh, founded a. S m r t p. H. O. N. E. dot io , uh , tell us a little bit about that and then also , um , some of the history behind how that came into being.

Jarett Duker:

Yeah. It didn't actually start in the Rei world. Um, that is a, yeah. Is ended up being there. Don't get me wrong, it's not , it's not mentioned

Gil Roberts:

material around it. That's right . A lot of them have really attached them that industry.

Jarett Duker:

No, it actually, the honest truth is, it comes back to before smart phone existed , um, I had launched a , uh, a sort of out of the box consultancy product, not based in Podio at all. Um, but a company , um, which was designed to give sort of virtual office solutions plus is what I'll say. Right. And part of that was a , uh , a phone team. And , uh, we were used to working in podio and this was a completely separate business. And I said to my CTO, Andrew, we gotta find a way of managing the phone shit through podio. And we ended up doing building an integration with Aircall that was, oh, was okay. But it didn't really integrate the way we wanted , um, because it couldn't, it , it just wasn't designed to do that. And , uh, but we did that and in my mind, it , it always stuck there

Jordan Felming:

when we did that. I mean, we can do this better. I just don't know how. And then we had a podio partner Webinar one day that was initiated by Helen and Kruti and , uh, and it was about the API changes they were making. Um, and on that call, Helen put me together with Vlad and Alex from swift pod and they were a, this was sort of right at the, before rei evolution, their product , um, the , or right around when we, they were starting, I guess I can't remember, but , um, the point is we kind of liked each other and we had a call and I said, look, I got this idea , um, and I've got this idea for a phone integration, but we don't have the technical ability to code it. That's not who we are. And , and they were like, well shit, we got the technical operative , you know, we got that. Um, so I, you know, I pulled together a design for how I wanted the workflow , kind of a lucid chart. Uh , we looked at it and in a very quick time we had a prototype that was working and Eh , you know, and, and since then I have to say, it is just been, you know , since we launched it, it has been increasing, increasing. You've obviously seen the smart dialer been launched that's going on everywhere and , and you know , but that's the origins of smartphone.

Gil Roberts:

That's fantastic. And just for those that haven't encountered it, just give us a, a quick pitch on kind of what it does from a, from a phone standpoint.

Jordan Felming:

Well, I mean, so smart, uh,smart phone is a, a full voip solution that is built 100% for podio. So it means that you can integrate your phone, inbound, outbound phone and SMS , um, into your podio ecosystem so that you can automate your phone calls . You know, you can click the call, you can, when someone calls you, you can see 'em get all the information from podio, track everything, record everything and have it all managed in podio. Which means that your CRM , uh , when you include email as well, which of course we do for all of our clients, you've got full communication tracking in a way that most people in Podio, all they ever do is like maybe they try and log that they've called someone. Well we actually in real time are logging every single call or text message in and out.

Gil Roberts:

We love that. Our clients that we've instituted this with, we draft a lot of the KPIs off their agent activity. A , of course it's CRM, outbound sales related, most of them in the Rei world. Again, they just kind of, that industry is really attached to this product. Uh , but we're, we're able to kind of show them what's going on , uh , with, with their call agents, the outbound calls and then , and then , you know, you've got those beautiful podio tiles. We can just start putting in, you know , how many calls that agents made for the day, week, what have you, so that they can keep track. They get to, we always joke, they get the micromanage without being a micromanager. Right. So , um , I , I think it's a brilliant product. Again, we've instituted and anybody out there listening, you know, definitely swing by the website, take a look, see if is , if it's for you or for your clients. Uh , tell us a little bit about smart dial. I know that just came out, right?

Jordan Felming:

Uh , yeah. So smart dial is easy in response to the Rei community. Um, without question. I mean, we, there was no th I will say that although it didn't initiate initially , uh , start with the real estate investment in community , um, it very quickly got taken up by them as our major customer base. I mean, we've, we've got customers all over the world on smartphone , um, with different industries. But the truth is, without question, our largest sector is rei. Absolutely. Um, uh, so , uh, and that, and smart dialer really was in direct response. We were , uh , we were consistently asked by our top Rei clients who used smartphone and loved it. Um, you know, hey, I still gotta use Mojo dialer and you know, and , and hey, can you please do something about this? I'm tired of using Mojo dialer and not having everything. I love the fact that smartphone logs everything in podio and I can track all my metrics, but I can't do that with Mojo. And , um, when we , we looked at it and we, you know, it's not an, it's not an uncomplex thing to do. A smart dialer like that. We've got a four line dialer . Um, it is, there's a lot of technical complexity to that, but , um, we thought, you know, we got , we're getting enough people begging for it and the finances stack up if we build this product , uh, you know, it is a considerable revenue stream on top of the smart phone , so let's, let's go do it. And you know, it , it was not an easy , uh , product to develop, but it has been received very well and it's a really starting to take off.

Alex Shull:

Well, I want to say that's great that you answered the call there. Um, from my perspective, when I tried to contrast the , the capabilities and the power of salesforce in the entire ecosystem that exists around it , um, and then I see you providing these integrations that are built directly for podio. It really helps make the case that, you know, there is a lot of parity for the people out there. You know, considering salesforce as an option, I'll , cause I , I, in the installations I've worked with in the past, the voip integration was a really key point of um, how valuable salesforce was to the team. And you really just, you know, put it on an even playing field with the, some of the systems that I've worked with in the past by providing these solutions . So, you know, all the credit to you.

Jordan Felming:

Well, I'm , and I always, we, we really like to hear from guys particularly, you know, if you're integrating with clients, we love to hear the feedback and you know, and we love to find out how people are using it. One of the things I learned from people using it , um, is , uh, how much we should try to be pushing our clients to listen to the calls that are being made by their agents. Um, you'd be surprised how many people record all their damn calls. Um, but then don't bother to quality check the call. Uh, you know, and so what we've started to institute with, with some of our clients , um, you know, game changes wise is a process whereby if they lose a prospect or they lose a sale or they lose an opportunity , um, flag up the phone calls involved with it so that we can say, well, is there a problem with what we're saying on the phone? Cause sometimes, I mean, you've listened to some of these calls, they're horrendous.

Gil Roberts:

Yeah.

Jordan Felming:

You know , have you guys found them ? What have you guys found in terms of , uh, of, of working with your clients around reviewing calls?

Gil Roberts:

You know , it's a, it's a good point. Um, and actually we see the same thing can , can it anything particularly new. But what we do tell them is it's, it's a missed opportunity of to exactly your point of, hey, maybe we should check the quality of the agents work, but we also tell them, hey, help the agent out . Right? This is a moment for coaching. This is a moment to make them a better employee, make them better at their job, right? And , and heck, if they, if they're just terrible at it, they'll be able to hear that and then they can make a decision as a, as a human being, as a person that maybe I shouldn't be doing this line of work. Right? Like give them the, the positive side of being able to, to understand their performance and coaching . And I think that from a management perspective, smart phone helps with that . Just that level of transparency call by call to understand maybe, maybe it's not even the agents, right? Maybe it's, maybe it's our script, maybe it's how we're doing calls. Maybe it's the process that we do to close. You know, sometimes it's not always the agent. So I think the, and what we're both digging at here is the, just the general transparency t hat smartphone allows a lot of organizations to have to be able to look at a prospect, kind of do a postmortem on what happened, taking a look at the calls, maybe coach the agent if that's what's required. Maybe the agent does some s elf h elp, you know, if they allow the agent to access their own calls. U m, or hey, l et's look at our process. Sounds like the g uy, you know, he was selling h is h eart out and just didn't work out. Um, maybe it's something that we're doing. Maybe it's something with the product, you know, who knows. And having a smartphone there to open that up for a lot of people I think is extremely important. And that's what we triy to tell them. And that's, we do a lot of Mojo dialer conversions from , from Mojo over to a smart phone . It's almost always the case when , when we're seeing it, especially again, especially over in the Rei guys, cause they're , they were hooked to the Mojo dialer. Not that that's a terrible product, but for those that are podio based uh, it just , uh , it just doesn't make a lot of sense and they come to us asking for that for that Mojo integration. We're like, well, we can attempt to do that. It's, you know, here's a figure with some commas in it, right? Or we can take over this smartphone product and it's so much cheaper. We set it up really quickly and you know, tomorrow day after you can , you can be switched over. It's already kind of integrated out of the box. So kind of , it's kind of a no brainer for them cause a lot of them, they're like, well, I just need, I just need it to work. Right. That's it . At the end of the day, going back to what you talk about, the kind of the business vision, you know, we just need the business vision to work on the side. So, definitely if for those that are listening out there, there are agencies like ourselves , um, you know, this is a great opportunity to up sell a product, upsell some integrations, and actually deliver some great value to the client. Uh, I know on the smart phone website that there is a affiliate program, is that right?

Jordan Felming:

Oh, you bet . There is. I was just actually thinking to myself, are you guys even in that? Yeah ,

Gil Roberts:

I've applied hint, hint. Uh , but , uh , not at this time. Yeah. But I'm sure others ,

Jordan Felming:

uh , that , that's all right. We can backfill you . Yeah, I was actually genuinely thinking about that because we've just , um , we've just changed the affiliate program. Okay . We just change it. I'm just , uh , if we originally the affiliate program was, you were only a , we were only doing affiliate stuff on a smartphone licenses and it was a , a fixed $20 a month per smartphone license you sold. So , um , for , for client and that was working really well. That's been working really well. We've got , um, uh , a number of , uh, of , uh , affiliates that are selling , um, smartphone. And , um, but what we've done is we've changed that to a flat to a 30% of all licensing. Oh Wow. So, yeah. So , um , now that's not like usage, so you're not making money on the calls or the either the minutes and the numbers and that, but, but when you add smart dialer into the mix , um , you can seriously get a relatively large , um, a relatively large , uh , commission every month by, you know, by adding, by selling smartphone . And then, you know, if you added a , you know, three smartphone, smart dialer a seats, you'd be making a, you know, probably close to a hundred bucks a month on that.

Gil Roberts:

Yeah. Just on that one account. And that's nice repeatable revenue , uh , the product's sticky. Uh, so it's, it's definitely worth those agencies , uh , time to, to look into this affiliate program. Again. Anybody listening you can go to a smart phone, s m r t p h o n e. Dot. I O and take a look there. Um, so I wanted to just kind of wrap today's segment with you , uh, in , in regards to just some, some things, podio and just do a little shop talk. I know from our feedback in , in the podio and Golbi flow user forums, people were really interested in development and what that means. So I want to just leave us with kind of a deep dive into how you feel that podio is kind of technical development, its API, and , and even, you know, things like Globi flow or proc Fu , um, how that's leading the community and how you see those tools continuing to mature.

Jordan Felming:

Oh , that's funny. Um , uh , I recorded , um, we were talking earlier about my podcast. Um, last night I recorded , um , our , uh , podcast with Andreas , um, from , uh , Andreas from , um, a globi flow originally and then obviously , uh , then proc Fu and a and , uh , Globi mail. So , uh , we talked a lot about that. I mean, for me, you know, from a podio point of view, you know, you constantly on the podio partner for Web , uh, you know, workspace or the , why , the globi flow one. You see every, it's almost clockwork. Every quarter you're going to have someone who's going to post. What's podio doing? Why aren't we getting new features? Right? Um, it's like, it's like you can set your watch by it. Um, and, and again, everybody chimes in and says, well, what are you like, what are you talking about? What do you really need? Um, because the truth is, as I think you know, you guys have discussed , um, podio is being increasingly used as a platform by a lot of people to develop amazing things. And you know, without globiflow, globiflow was the instigator in my opinion, without globiflow Podio, unless you know how to do API work , um , without globiflow . And podio is just a very nice looking blue access box in a three dimensional structure. I mean, that's all it is. Um, once you add , in my opinion, once you add, once you added , um , once you added a globiflow into the mix, it became this thing that could do anything. And, and I think that from my perspective, you know, I know proc Fu is opening up a world. Uh , I mean we've used Procfu now to do some amazing things. Um, Eh , you know, we, we do a lot of direct API integration and what I'm seeing is a w is a more and more and wider push for people , um, developing these sort of platform centric podio systems, not just as partners but on the proc fu workspace on the globi flow workspace . And I think we're going that way more and more.

Gil Roberts:

That's fantastic. I have to 100% agree. I personally, I started using podio December of 2012 so it's been, what , six odd years, almost seven , uh , coming up. So I remember it before they had the, the, the little workflow, the, the um , the smaller automations that podio actually made that I get that I go around or I haven't been by in a long time, but I do remember the globi flow days when it , when it felt like a really great , uh, piece of web form software, right. That just had relationship fields. So I, I do remember that. I think that globiflow before really progressed the platform into, into the vision that we see it going forward and the reason that we're attracted to it so much.

Jordan Felming:

Absolutely. And then I've been, I mean, a couple years ago , um, Citrix invited me out to California , uh, to their , uh, annual , uh , what do they call it? Not Synergy. It's , um, Citrix con , which one ? Which one? Um, it doesn't matter that Citrix runs these two big things, big conferences every year. And they, a couple years ago, they invited myself and about, three, I think three other partners , um, podio partners , uh , to go out and , uh , and as their, as their guests , um, at this thing in California to really kind of get part of the Citrix ecosystem. And , and one of the things that struck me as amazing at the time is I remember speaking just so, and I have, I know I go to Citrix headquarters in Raleigh , um, probably twice a year now. Um , like clockwork, I go, I visit twice a year and I talk to the developers and I talk to all the salespeople and I give 'em , uh , I give them , uh , masterclasses on how, what we're building in Podio to give them an and train them on sales tech, you know, sort of show them sales techniques around podio things. Uh, no , not official ones. But what always struck me as amazing was , um, you know, once you add globi flow , they, the, the things we were able to do and show these guys, they were all blown away at a Citrix level. Like the , the guys, the guys who are actually, I remember sitting in Raleigh with the, the guys who are actually developing in po like developing podio and show, showing them an integration we'd done with Barcode scanning and, and the guy was like, Holy Shit, you can do that with Podio? You know, and , and no, he didn't realize that we can integrate a barcode scanner into computer, we can scan a barcode and then we could use globiflow to automate the shit out of it. And , um, I have

Alex Shull:

to say that, you know, as a developer, you know, I've been writing code, working on systems, I've seen all sorts of, you know , corporate infrastructures and tools and everything. And when , when I use Podio, even today, I'm regularly discovering the potential that it has just based upon its good, clean, simple design and it has nice, well-defined interfaces. And there is a set of tools there that once you open them up and you look inside and, and you understand how to use them and how to master them, there is a , a massive world of possibility and potential already sitting right there just as you described. And a lot of people don't realize that there . And if you, the people who want the, a bunch of things added and changed and expanded, I think sometimes they haven't really seen the full vision for what it's already capable of doing today.

Jordan Fleming:

Well now let me ask, can I, if I, if I may just ask the question , um, uh , I know we're, we're gonna wrap up, but one of the things, and one of my answers to , uh , I'm , I'm , I'm constantly asked by people , um, how difficult or easy is it to onboard podio into an organization? And, and I, my stock answer is, look, anytime you change a system, there's going to be change management challenges, right? There's going to be periods where you are , um, it's going to get worse before it gets better, right? Because people are going, oh, why doesn't it work like this? Why didn't I kind of do things the way you used to do? But I always also say one of the great things about podio is that it always works the same way. And um, you know, and, and because its UI always works the same way and because all these bits always work the same way, once I get a team trained on a small phase, I can rapidly add other phases and they already know how to use podio. They already know what to expect. I could bring in a completely separate business functionality into podio and they will intuitively understand how to use it. And that's one of the bits that I was curious what your thoughts on that. And it's one of the my stock answers to anytime someone says, why isn't podio changing the interface? I always say Jesus Christ don't do that. And this is why.

Gil Roberts:

And that's fair.

Alex Shull:

Speak up Jarett man, you sound like you sound like Jarett there. Jordan.

Jarett Duker:

I'm actually a kind of disturbed and incredibly pleased. How much of the same things we have been saying without ever meeting a , if we'd hung out more you, you would hear me s almost use the exact same terminology that you're using right now, either both with our clients or with other partners. Trying to help them understand that um, once the ecosystem is established, the continuity of design is inherent to the platform itself. I like to say that you don't have to do change management with an organization for podio. You have to do it with a department and it will spread. It's almost viral in that way. Once one department gets stuck on it, it's almost inevitable that more and more departments will domino in. And because of the intrinsic efficiencies created by the sleek UI, I am the just great range of integrations that we can easily and quickly get spun up for any one business function.

Gil Roberts:

What you're talking about there , Jordan, I believe is just completely underrated. You know, I think it's something that that's really nebulous to a lot of organizations because they have to go through that chain, that very initial change period and wrestle with it a , but once, once you have your, from a management perspective, you have your workforce trained in a product that you can just roll out any kind of functionality and sometimes within hours or maybe days, depending on how complex it is, they're fully up to speed that that learning curve is just so flattened for additional productivity enhancing things that come out. I mean, it's just, it's, it's just underrated. I think that, you know, the , again, they always , you always see the pain that's right there in front of you, which is that initial change. So , uh , as Jared said, as we get one department kind of hooked on it or, or one piece of a structure hooked on it, it wants to spread, right? Like other people see it and go, oh my goodness , uh, I wish I had this, cause I'm still working in this archaic piece of software or whatever. Um, and they just, and , and it also helps the virality that things integrate departments integrate really easy that you can, you can waste things together , uh , through automation. So you , you know, we have a lot of times CRM is kind of the first door that we walk into and then then the operations team, you know, they want to start getting it and then maybe we go a compliance, they want some e-signatures, you know, and it just Kinda, you know , just sits there and kind of eats into an organization. And kind of coming back to the top level is conversation. Uh , you talked about this , uh , the podio programmers not, not knowing about Barcode scanning and some of these other kind of cool tips and tricks that we're , we're getting , uh , getting this to do. Sometimes I have to say, I wonder if, if Citrix truly understands kind of what they have, you know, I know the podio team does, but sometimes you just think that maybe they don't pay enough attention to it.

Jordan Felming:

Uh, yeah. I mean, I've spent enough time in the Po in the Citrix headquarters. Um, you know, I think that we , we definitely, there are some people in , um, uh, I've had some conversations that are , maybe I can relate to you off recording. Um, but , uh, you know, I think that there are definitely some people in Citrix who are cheerleaders of podio. Um, but I don't think that it's ever really been understood. And that's because, you know, for, you know, every time if you go to podio's website right now it's like, well, CRM, project management and, and there's no question that probably all of us get our start with podio because we're looking for something that we can't find anywhere else. Um, but the challenge os of course, you know, the challenge is that as, as long as , um, as, as we're still trying to shoehorn podio into only being a CRM or only being a project management tool then then, which is I feel sometimes what Citrix does in their marketing, not the podio team, but Citrix. Um , I think we're missing the biggest and widest opportunity, which is podio as a platform , um, and, and that is the bit where I think we're just not there yet with Citrix.

Gil Roberts:

That's fair. Well, I think they had , so obviously we could go on all day about this. So we'll go ahead and wrap our episode for now. Is there anything else that you want our listeners to know? Kind of roll the red carpet out for you and just tell them what you've got going on?

Jordan Felming:

Ah , so many things. A , we've got a new product for property management , uh , workflow management , uh , in property management companies that we've launched. And that's going unbelievably well. Uh, really I'm just excited for the podio community. I think it's great that you guys are doing this podcast. Um, I think the more we can get people understanding and excited about Podio, the better. I'd encourage everybody to be active in the workspaces in globi flow and some of the other ones. Um, you know, and I'd encourage, you know , everybody to , uh, really try and share as much as we can. I think one of the hidden values from a partner perspective , um, you know, I , I think I, I started the first European partner meetup , uh, three or four years ago , um , which was literally just me saying, Hey, does anybody in Europe fancy getting together for some beers? And Citrix went, oh, we'll host that. And we ended up having an amazing day. And we , we did our third one , um , last year and we're going to do a fourth one this year. But one of what that demonstrates is the close relationship that podio has as a product to the two people. I've never had Microsoft and it has never bought me a beer. Um, and, and I've never bothered to give a shit about meeting up , uh, with anybody from that ecosystem. And yet I, I know for the listeners, those were willing where the meet up is going to be. Uh , well , well I don't have that scheduled yet, but we're , well the podio partner meetups will be done on the podio partner workspace as always. We'll put in dates, we'll put in locations, it'll either be, the probably be Munich or Copenhagen. We usually get in Copenhagen. Um, and those there , but they are for polio partners only.

Gil Roberts:

That's fantastic. Now what, what about us here? Uh , based in North America. I know last year there was an attempt to, is there going to be another attempt this year?

Jordan Felming:

Yeah, we'll do one. Um, uh, w w there's no question. We're gonna do a , a a North American meetup. Um, it's just a question of where , um, but I will be organizing one in Europe and one in North America this year.

Gil Roberts:

Well, definitely let us know about that and if you need any help, we're, we're here to offer that assistance. Jordan, thank you so much. This has been a just stimulating conversation. I hope our listeners got a lot of value out of this. Um, and , and we just really appreciate you , uh, being on with us. Subscribe. Uh , it is powered by Podio podcast .

Jordan Felming:

Is that right? It's actually called supercharged. Um , Gotcha. Yeah . Supercharged and supercharged with Jordan , Samuel Fleming . Uh , and that's, that's who we are.

Gil Roberts:

Subscribe , uh , to Jordan's podcast. You're listening to us. You need to be listening to him. I think our , our content is going to be very complimentarity , uh , with each other, especially with you having a lot of interviews. US, we're, we're going to be focused a little bit more on the technical, a lot of, into the API side and kind of getting nerdy on design. So I think that , uh, any listener is going to get tons of value from both of our podcasts . So definitely subscribe and Jordan, thank you so much.

Jordan Felming:

Thanks guys. Great speaking with you ,

Gil Roberts:

Jordan. Appreciate you coming onto our podcast. I know you have a podcast that's coming out and that's going to be coming out on Monday. Is that right?

Jordan Felming:

Uh , I believe so. We've already recorded , um, I think about this week, we've done seven episodes. Okay . So we're going to release the first sort of three or four next week and then , uh , it's going to be weekly after that. So I'm hoping next week, Monday

Gil Roberts:

and uh, for , uh, for our audience, where can they find your podcast right now?

Jordan Felming:

Uh, it is going to be up on apple. We're just waiting for their authorization, you know, that whole process. And , um, it's going to be up on apple. It's already up on Spotify. Uh , it will be up on Google, but because I'm actually in Poland right now, they're having a geographic block. Um, yeah . Which I didn't realize. So I'm gonna wait . Uh , Google may come in a couple of weeks when I traveled to the UK or to the u s and , uh, and I, and I then go back to them and say, okay, how about now? Uh, but you'll be able to find them there. And of course, we also have a page on our website with all the episodes , uh, there as well.

Gil Roberts:

Excellent. And now you , uh , your company, game changers that's going to be located at, we are game changers.com. Um, we're going to have the podcast, you guys going to have the podcast up there. I , I know , uh , when we first initially started talking, we saw your announcement of your podcast . We were about to launch our podcast as well. So kind of two at one. So we were joking. Great minds think alike, right? So let's talk about a , obviously our listeners know a little bit about our content. Um , now we've gotten a few episodes out. Let's talk about what type of content you guys are going to have on your podcast.

Jordan Felming:

Yeah , so a , I'm focusing our podcasts really strictly on interviewing people. Uh, the usually around a , you know, somewhere between 25 and 35 minute long podcasts. Uh , nothing really longer than that. Um, so that you can, you can have a quick hit on a weekly basis. And , um, there are basically three types of podcast we're doing. Um , number one, we're talking to polio partners , uh , different podium partners around the world who , uh , you know, they've got different views on , uh , on Podio, on how to integrate podio. They've got stories about what's good, what's bad. They've got products, et cetera. Number two, we are talking to the add ons and the product people. So people who have built , um, either official podio add ons or who have integrated other systems and have a product to do that , um, or who have built products using podio. So , uh , you know, they'll products on top of podio. And then finally , uh , we're talking to actual people, customers. So , uh, we're talking to, to companies who aren't partners and not integrators, they're just companies who use podio in their day to day life and , and really trying to learn from them, you know, for people like they get their story get . Um, what was it like to get involved with podio? Uh, what were the challenges? What were the things that worked well? I think that gives people a really good sense of, of, of where they can go with podio. So those are the three things that we're focused on.

Gil Roberts:

That's fantastic. [inaudible] you liked that last part about the clients' stories that you guys are going to cover? I think one of the things that we, we've dove into in a couple of episodes that that's really important is the design aspect. I know a lot of us like to , to get under the hood and get into the details, but sometimes that the design requirements that clients need is just so important and it really shapes that user experience. Uh , obviously we get, we get to piggyback off of Podio is great interface, but you know how we design things where , where the fields go I think sometimes get lost on the technical side.

Jordan Felming:

Okay. Absolutely . So , um ,

Gil Roberts:

I noticed something else on, on your guys' websites. You guys do some, I'm , I'm focusing on game changers here real quickly. Tell us about what kind of services that you guys have there. And I love how you guys have bespoke systems and uh , one , one more comment. I believe that's a, a Aston Martin or a Bentley on the front page department .

Jordan Felming:

Yeah, it's a Bentley. It's a Bentley and not a bad looking car. Um, uh, yeah. So, I mean, game changer is , you know, so game changes has been going as a company for 14 years. And , uh, I started at sort of, you know, the classic Ed of your bedroom. And , um, uh, about seven years ago we found podio. And about four years ago, we seriously decided that this is it for us. And, you know, and, and really the company has been skyrocketing. We've got now team and you know, in Asia, in Europe and North America, and we've got companies in, in Europe , uh, well, Europe , uh , UK and America. Um, and we've got clients in about 16 countries now. Um, you know, everything from government agencies down to, you know, subway sandwiches is one of our clients , um, uh, oil and gas companies right down to mom and pop, like, you know, two man band, one man band

Jarett Duker:

companies. And , um, you know, we , we really focus on , uh , the kind of change management and , uh , management consultancy side of designing podio where you're going in and you're really investigating the business so that you can understand how they work, understand how they're suffering from maybe existing systems and design a process and a podio architecture that is going to maximize,

Alex Shull:

yeah . That is a really impressive spread of clients that you're able to serve. And it really speaks not only to the great attitude you have about being able to solve problems with the flexibility of Podio to be able to apply to all those different situations. It's a really , um , remarkable, and I think we, you know, you're in , um , company with , um, people who think very, very similarly about what the power of Podio is and the right way to get people to understand the value that it can provide.

Jarett Duker:

Absolutely. I mean, from what I've seen of your guys' , uh , work and, and we'll listen to your podcast . I think the mindset mindset's very similar. And you know, we've just been really lucky in , um, you know, we've, we've been expanding the team and we've been very lucky at getting involved with a lot of great organizations around the world and um, and being, and as you pointed out, the power, the flexibility and power of podio to be anything to anyone anywhere is, is just unbelievable. Yeah. Yeah. These are all great points. Have you, let's talk about something. I know that we've found a lot of different ways to apply. Have you found anything that it hasn't excelled at ? Uh , then it just didn't, didn't fire off only I'll be honest, only were the , the two times it doesn't fire in my opinion, the two , the scenarios and we've like anyone, we've had projects that have been amazing, but we've also had projects that peasant , right? Like nobody bats a thousand. Nobody bats a hundred percent. We, we have had our taught at times where we have challenges and, and what matters is how you address them. I'm , I'm happy to say we usually are able to address those very well. I would say where we don't find that working is number one, where we don't get the buy in from the full executive team. Um, it, you know, of course when we, when we approach a customer , um, I always say to the executive team, I need your 100% buy-in , not because I'm going to do everything through you because the truth is you guys don't know anything. I'm going to work with your employees, but if you're not the one, if you're not bought into this and you're not championing it, we're dead. Right. That's number one. And the second time , um, is where we have allowed clients , um, you know , it doesn't happen much anymore, but where we have allowed things to be overcomplicated when we, what we really should have done is simplified them. Jared, I'm sure you have tried not to laugh too hard this age .

Alex Shull:

Yeah .

Gil Roberts:

Yeah. And Jordan, Jared is our, he's our principal consultant and designers. So he probably feels that a right at heart with what you're saying there. So

Jarett Duker:

yeah, you're speaking definite truth right now. Um, change management is a very difficult thing to orchestrate throughout an organization. And without strong buy in from senior leadership and their vision, even if they don't know exactly where the train is headed, is absolutely critical and controlling complexity. It is so easy to create just spider webbing, app architectures , uh , so quickly. And if you don't design well from the beginning to anticipate , uh , expanding complexity, you can just get yourself into such a mess so incredibly quickly. So it's , it's really nice to hear someone else feels my pain.

Alex Shull:

Jordan, I wanted to ask you a question related to that. Um, do you practice a, an, an agile methodology or anything along those lines in terms of the way you deal with gathering requirements and , um , delivering , um , updates and things like that?

Jarett Duker:

Um, kind of , um, I, you know, my background, Jesus , my background is as a professional musician. Um, so I'm not gonna pretend I'm , you know, I'm not gonna pretend like I have any sort of massive training in project management or anything like that. What we've found is , um, you know, I, my background in terms of businesses , I always been, my strength is going into places and analyzing the businesses and figuring out what sucks, what needs to be fixed and how to do it right. That's, that's what , and it translates well with podio. Um, and you know, and then we have developed a methodology for tracking projects for updating clients, for , uh, putting, you know, and , and we , we continue to evolve that, but it is not a , a defined like off the shelf , um, agile process that you might , uh , see people trained in.

Alex Shull:

Yeah, I understand. So it sounds like you have some of the principles that you use because you know how beneficial they are, but when you interact with a client within, in that engagement at the beginning, you kind of make sure that you have a process that fits their needs specifically, so you don't force them or pigeonhole them into a single way of doing things. But your principles are pretty standard and you apply them over and over. Does that sound right?

Jarett Duker:

Yeah, we have a defined way of running every custom project. Um , we have a defined way. We go through a a to a two to three week business analysis and business needs scope process first where we, I'm usually two days on site where we rip apart the whole business and talk to everybody. And then we create a, what we call a business needs scope, which is a non technical document that outlines what this phase of work has to accomplish from a business point of view. Forget technical, forget systems integrations,

Jordan Felming:

what do we need to accomplish from a business perspective? Um , that gets signed off. And then that really is the Holy Bible we use in our, we, we go through then a process of a two week process of system design where we , um, where we lay out how we want to do things. And then usually a anywhere from a a four that a to eight week build and um, you know, process where we're doing a rapid prototyping, getting things, things built quickly and then automating them. And then you're looking at a , uh , a data migration testing and training process after that. And it's standard across every customer system we do. Now. That's great. That's great.

Gil Roberts:

So what's a , this weekend of systems ? What's , what's dive into a product that we know and love and actually use it and used with some of our client installation , especially over in the Rei world. I know that's kind of where it started, which is smart phone , uh , founded a . S m r t p. H. O. N. E. That io , uh, tell us a little bit about that and then also , um, some of the history behind how that came into being.

Jordan Felming:

Yeah. It didn't actually start in the Rei world. Um, that is a, yeah, it is ended up being there. Don't get me wrong. It's, yeah , there's no question

Gil Roberts:

the material around it. That's where I really attached to that industry.

Jordan Felming:

No, it actually, the honest truth is it comes back to before smartphone existed , um, I had launched a , uh, a sort of out of the box consultancy product, not based in Podio at all. Um, but , uh , a company , um, which was designed to give sort of virtual office solutions plus is what I'll say. Right. And part of that was a, a phone team. And , uh , we were used to working in podio and this was a completely separate business. And I said to my CTO, Andrew, we got to find a way of managing the phone shit through podio. And we ended up doing building an integration with Aircall that was, oh, was okay, but didn't really integrate the way we wanted , um , because it couldn't, it just wasn't designed to do that. And , uh, but we did that and in my mind it had always stuck there. When we did that, I mean, we can do this better, I just don't know how. And then we had a podio partner Webinar one day that was initiated by Helen and crude and , uh, and it was about the API changes they were making. Um, and on that call, Helen put me together with Vlad and Alex from swift pod and they were a, this was sort of right at the, before rei evolution, their products , um, or right around when we , they were starting, I guess, I can't remember. But , um, the point is we kind of liked each other and we had a call and I said, look, I got this idea and I've got this idea for a phone integration, but we don't have the technical ability to coat it. That's not who we are. And, and they were like, well shit, we got the technical you , we got bad . Um, so I, you know, I pulled together a design for how I wanted the work flow, kind of a lucid chart. Uh , we looked at it and in a very quick time we had a prototype that was working and Eh , you know, and, and since then, I have to say, it is just been, you know, since we launched it, it has been increasing, increasing. You've obviously seen the smart dialer been launched. That's going really well, but that's the origins of smartphone.

Gil Roberts:

That's fantastic. And just for those that haven't encountered it, just give us a, a quick pitch on kind of what it does from a, from a phone standpoint.

Jordan Felming:

Uh , well I mean, so, so smart smartphone is a full voip solution , uh , that is built 100% for podio. So it means that you can integrate your phone, inbound, outbound phone and SMS , um, into your podio ecosystem so that you can automate your phone call . You know, you can click the call, you can , when someone calls you, you can see 'em get all the information from podio, track everything, record everything and have it all managed in Podio, which means that your CRM , uh , when you include email as well, which of course we do for all of our clients, you've got full communication tracking in a way that most people in Podio, all they ever do is like maybe they try and log that they've called someone. Well, we actually in real time are logging every single call or text message in and out.

Gil Roberts:

We love that. Our , our clients that we've instituted this with, we draft a lot of the KPIs off their agent activity. Uh , of course they had CRM, outbound sales related. Most of them in the Rei world. Again, they just kind of, that industry is really attached to this product. Uh, but we're, we're able to kind of show them what's going on with, with their call agents . The outbound calls and then, and then, you know, you've got those beautiful podio tiles, we can just start putting in, you know , how many calls that agents made for the day, week, what have you, so that they can keep track. They get to, we always joke they get to micromanage without being a micromanager. Right. So , um, I think it's a brilliant product. Again, we've instituted and anybody out there listening, you know, definitely swing by the website, take a look, see if it's , if it's for you or for your clients. Uh , tell us a little bit about smart dollar . I know that just came out, right?

Jordan Felming:

Uh , yeah. So smart dollar is easy in response to the Rei community. Um, without question. I mean, we, there was no, I will say that although it didn't initially initially start with the real estate investment in the community , um, it very quickly got taken up by them as our major customer base. I mean, we've, we've got customers all over the world and smartphone , um , with different industries, but the truth is, without question, our largest sector is rei. Absolutely. Um, uh, so , uh, and that, and smart dialer really was in direct response. We were , uh, we were consistently asked by our top Rei clients who use smart phone and loved it. Um, you know, hey, I still gotta use Mojo dialer. Yeah. And you know, and, and hey, can you please do something about this? I'm tired of using Mojo dialer and not having everything. I love the fact that smartphone logs everything in podio and I can track all my metrics, but I can't do that with Mojo. And , um, when we , we looked at it and we, you know, it's not an , it's not an uncomplex thing to do. A smart dialer like that. We've got a four line dyler . Um, it is, there's a lot of , uh , technical complexity of that, but , um, we thought, you know, we , we're getting enough people begging for it and the finances stack up if we build this product , uh, you know, it is a considerable , uh , revenue stream on top of smart phone . So let's, let's go do it. And you know, it was not an easy product to develop, but it is been received very well. And it's a really starting to take off.

Alex Shull:

Well I want to say that's great that you answered the call there. Um, from my perspective, when I tried to contrast the, the capabilities and the power of salesforce in the entire ecosystem that exists around it , um, and then I see you providing these integrations , um, that are built directly for podio. It really helps make the case that, you know, there's a lot of parody for the people out there. You know, considering salesforce as an option. Cause I , I, in the installations I've worked with in the past, the voip integration was a really key point of um , how valuable salesforce was. Do the team and you really just, you know, put it on an even playing field with the , some of the systems that I've worked with in the past by providing me solutions. So, you know, all the credit to you

Jordan Felming:

and I always, we, we really like to hear from guys particularly, you know, if you're integrating with clients, we love to hear the feedback and you know, and , and we love to find out how people are using it. One of the things I learned , um, from people using it , um, is , uh, how much we should try to be pushing our clients to listen to the calls that are being made by their agents. Um, you'd be surprised how many people record all their damn calls. Um, but then don't bother the quality check the call. Uh, you know, and so what we've started to introduce with some of our clients , um, you know, game changes wise is a process whereby if they lose a prospect or they lose a sale or they lose an opportunity , um , flag up the phone calls involved with it so that we can say, well, is there a problem with what we're saying on the phone? Cause sometimes, I mean, you've listened to some of these calls, the horrendous yeah.

Gil Roberts:

You know , have you guys found them? What have you guys found in terms of , uh, of , of working with your clients around reviewing calls? Yeah , it's a , it's a good point. Um , and actually we see the same thing. Can't, you can't do anything particularly new. But what we do tell them is it's, it's a missed opportunity of to exactly your point of, hey, maybe we should check the quality of the agent's work, but we also tell them, hey, help the agent out. Right? This is a moment for coaching. This is a moment to make them a better employee, make them better at their job, right? And Hack . If they, if they're just terrible at it, there'll be able to hear that and then they can make a decision as a, as a human being, as a person that maybe I shouldn't be doing this line of work. Right? Like give them the positive side of being able to, to understand their performance and, and coaching. I think that, you know , from a management perspective, smartphone helps with that . Just that level of transparency. You call by call to understand maybe, maybe it's not even the agents , right? Maybe it's, maybe it's our script, maybe it's how we're doing calls. Maybe it's the process that we do to close, you know, sometimes it's not always the agent that's so I think the , what we're both digging at here is the , just the general transparency that smartphone and allows a lot of organizations to have to be able to look at a prospect, kind of do a postmortem on what happened, taking look at the calls, maybe coach the agent if that's what's required. Maybe the agent does some self help, you know, if they allow the agent to access their own calls. Um, or hey, what's a look at our process? Sounds like the guy , you know, he was selling his heart out and just didn't work out. Um, maybe it's something that we're doing. Maybe it's something with the product, you know, who knows? And having a smartphone there to open that up for a lot of people I think is extremely important. And that's where we try to tell. And that's, we do a lot of Mojo dollar conversions from , from Mojo over to smart phone . It's almost always the case when we're seeing, especially again, especially over in the rei guys because they were hooked to the Mojo dialer. Not that that's a terrible product, but for those know that our podio base , uh, it just, it just doesn't make a lot of sense and they come to us asking for them for that Mojo integration and we're like, well, we can attempt to do that. It's, you know, here's , here's a figure with some commas in it. Right? Or we can take over this smartphone product and it's so much cheaper. We can set it up really quickly and you know, tomorrow day after you can, you can be switched over. It's already kinda integrated out of the box. So kind of , it's kind of a no brainer for them cause a lot of them, they're like, well I just need, I just needed to work. Right. That's it . At the end of the day, you're going back to what you talk about the kind of the business vision, you know, we just need the business vision to work on the side. So , uh , definitely if for those that are listening out there, there are agencies like ourselves , um, you know, this is a great opportunity to op , sell a product, upsell some integrations and actually deliver some great value to the client. Uh, I know on the smartphone website that there is a affiliate program. Is that right?

Jordan Felming:

There isn't, I was just actually thinking to myself, are you guys even in that? Um , yeah ,

Gil Roberts:

I've applied hint, hint. Uh, but , uh, but yeah , not at this time. Yeah. But , uh , I'm sure others,

Jordan Felming:

I love that . That's all right. We can backfill . Yeah . Yeah. I was actually genuinely think about that cause we've just , um, we just changed the affiliate program. Okay . We just change it. I'm just a, if we originally the affiliate program was, you were only, we were only doing affiliate , um , stuff on a smartphone licenses and it was a , a fixed $20 a month per smartphone license you sold. So , um, for, for client and that was working really well. That's been working really well. We've got , um, uh , a number of , uh, of , uh , affiliates that are selling , um, smartphone. And , um, but what we've done is we've changed that to a flat of 20 , 30% of all licensing. Oh Wow. So, yeah. So , um , now that's not like usage, so you're not making money on the calls or the either minutes or the numbers in that, but, but when you add smart dialer into the mix , um, you can seriously get a , a relatively large , um, a relatively large , uh , commission every month by, you know, by adding, by selling smartphone . And then, you know, if you added a , you know, three smartphone smart Tyler seats, you'd be making a, you know, probably close to a hundred bucks a month on that.

Gil Roberts:

Yeah. Just tell me I want to count and that , that's nice. Repeatable revenue , uh , the product sticky. Uh , so it's, it's definitely worth those agencies , uh , time to, to look into this affiliate program. Again. Anybody listening you can go to a smart phone, a s m a r t p h o n e. Dot. I O A and take a look there. Um, so I wanted to just kind of wrap today's segment with you , uh, in , in regards to just some, some things around podio and , and just do a little shop talk . I know , uh , from our feedback in , in the podio and globiflow user forums, people are really interested in , uh , development and what that means. So I want to just leave us with a kind of a deep dive into how you feel that podio is kind of technical development. It's API and , and even, you know, things like Globee flow or proc Fu , um, how that's leading the community and how you see those tools continuing to mature.

Jordan Felming:

That's funny. Um , uh, I recorded , um, we were talking earlier about my podcast. Um, last night I recorded , um, our , uh, podcast with Andrea's , um, from , uh, Andre's from , um, uh , globiflow originally and then obviously , uh , then proc Fu and a , and a global mail . So , uh, we talked a lot about that. I mean for me, you know, I , from a podium point of view, you're , you know, you constantly on the podio partner for Web , uh, you know, workspace or the, or the global flow one. You see every, it's almost clockwork. Every quarter you're going to have someone who's going to post, what's podio doing? Why aren't we getting new features? Right? Um, it's like, it's like you can set your watch by it. Um, and, and again, everybody chimes in and says, well, what do you like, what are you talking about? What do you really need? Um, because the truth is, as I think you know, you guys have discussed , um, podio is being increasingly used as a platform by a lot of people to develop amazing things. And you know, without globiflow globiflow was the instigator in my opinion, without globiflow Podio, unless you know how to do API work , um , without globiflow. Podio is just a very nice looking blue access box in a three dimensional structure. I mean, that's all it is. Um, once you are , in my opinion, once you add, once you added , um , once you added a globiflow into the mix, it became this thing that could do anything. And, and I think that from my perspective, you know, I know Prague Fu is opening up a world. Uh , I mean we've used proc food now to do some amazing things. Um, and you know, we, we do a lot of direct API integration and what I'm seeing is a w is a more and more and wider push for people , um , developing these sort of platform centric podio systems, not just as partners but on the proc food work space on the global flow work space . And I think we're going that way more and more.

Gil Roberts:

That's fantastic. I have to 100% agree. I personally, I started using podio December of 2012 so it's been, what , six odd years, almost seven coming up. So I remember it before they had the, the , uh , the little workflow, the, the, the , the smaller automations that podio actually made that I go around. I haven't been by a long time, but I , I do feel they're slow days when it, when it felt like a , a really great , uh, piece of web form software, right, that just had relationship fields. So I do remember that. I think they had a goal before really progressed the platform into, into the vision that we see it going for him and the reason that we're attracted to it so much.

Jordan Felming:

Absolutely. And then I've been, I mean, a couple of years ago , um, Citrix invited me out to California , uh, to their , uh, annual a , what do they call it? Not Synergy. It's , um , Citrix one , each one. Um, it doesn't matter that Citrix runs these two big things, big conferences every year. And they, a couple of years ago, they invited myself and , uh, a three, I think three other partners , um, [inaudible] partners , uh , to go out and , uh , and as their, as their guests , um, at this thing in California. So really kind of get part of the Citrix ecosystem. And , and one of the things that that struck me as amazing at the time is I remember speaking just so, and I have, I now I go to Citrix headquarters in Raleigh , um, probably twice a year now. Um, like clockwork, I go, I visit twice a year and I talked to the developers and I talked to all the sales people and I give 'em , uh , I give them a masterclasses on how, what we building in Podio to give them and train them on sales tech, you know, instead of show them sales techniques around , uh , podio things , uh, not , not official ones, but what always struck me as amazing was , um, you know, once you add globiflow they, the, the things we were able to do and show these guys, they were all blown away at a Citrix level. Like the guys, the guys who are actually, I remember sitting in rally with the guys who were actually developing in Po , like developing podio and showing them an integration we'd done with Barcode scanning. And, and the guy was like, Holy Shit, you can do that with podio. You know, and no, he didn't realize that we could integrate a barcode scanner into computer, we can scan a barcode and then we could use glow before to automate the shit out of it. And um,

Alex Shull:

I say that, you know, as a developer, you know, I've been writing code, working on systems, I've seen all sorts of, you know, corporate infrastructures and tools and everything. And when I use Podio, even today, I'm regularly discovering the potential that it has just based upon it's good, clean, simple design and it has nice, well-defined interfaces. And there is a set of tools there that once you open them up and you look inside and , and you understand how to use them and how to master them, there is a, a massive world of possibility and potential already sitting right there just as you described. And a lot of people don't realize that there . And if you in the people who want the, a bunch of things added and changed and expanded, I think , um, sometimes they haven't really seen the full vision for what it's already capable of doing today.

Jordan Felming:

Well now let me ask, can I, if I, if I may just ask the question , um, uh , I know we're, we're gonna wrap up, but one of the things, and one of my answers to , uh , I'm a , I'm constantly asked by people , um, how difficult or easy is it to onboard podio into an organization? And, and I,

Jarett Duker:

my stock answer is, look, anytime you change a system, there's going to be change management challenges, right? There's going to be periods where you are , um, W it's going to get worse before it gets better, right? Because people are going, oh, why doesn't it work like this? Why didn't I kind of do things way used to do. But I always also say one of the great things about podio is that it always works the same way. And um, you know, and, and because its UI always works the same way and because all these bits always worked the same way, once I get a team trained on a small phase, I can rapidly add other phases and they already know how to use podio. They already know what to expect. I can bring in a completely separate business functionality into podio and they will intuitively understand how to use it. And that's one of the bits that I was curious what your thoughts on that. And it's one of the my stock answers to anytime someone says, why isn't podio changing the interface? I always say, Jesus Christ don't do that. And this is why.

Gil Roberts:

And that's fair.

Jarett Duker:

Speak Up German man. You're like , you sound like Jared there Jordan. I'm actually kind of disturbed and incredibly pleased. How much of the same things we have been saying without ever meeting a , if we'd hung out more, you , you would hear me almost used the exact same terminology that you're using right now, either both with our clients or with other partners. Trying to help them understand that , um, once the ecosystem is established, the continuity of design is inherent to the platform itself. I like to say that you don't have to do change management with an organization for podio. You have to do it with a department and it will spread. It's almost viral in that way. Once one department gets stuck on it, it's almost inevitable that more and more departments will domino . And because of the intrinsic efficiencies created by the sleek UI, I am the just great range of integrations that we can easily and quickly get spun up for anyone , a business function,

Gil Roberts:

what you're talking about there , Jordan, I believe is just completely underrated. You know, I think it's something that it's really nebulous to a lot of organizations because they have to go through that chain, that very initial change period and wrestle with it. Uh , but once, once you have your, from a management perspective, you have your workforce trained in a product that you can just roll out any kind of functionality and sometimes within hours or maybe days, depending on how complex it is, they're fully up to speed. That that learning curve is just so flattened for additional productivity enhancing things that come out. I mean, it's just, it's, it's just underrated. I think that, you know, again, they , you always see the pain that's right there in front of you , which is that initial change. So , uh , as Jared said, as , as we get one department kind of hooked on it or, or one piece of a structure hooked on it, it wants to spread, right? Like other people see it and go, oh my goodness , uh, I wish I had this, cause I'm still working on this archaic piece of software or whatever. Um, and they just, and , and it also helps the virality that things integrate departments integrate really easy that you can, you can lace things together , uh , through automation. So, you know, we have a lot of times CRM is Kinda the first door that we walk into and then the operations team, you know, they want to start getting it and then maybe we go a compliance, they want some e-signatures, you know, and I just Kinda , you know , just sits there and kind of eats into an organization and kind of coming back to the top level as conversation , uh , you talked about this , uh , the podio programmers not, not knowing about Barcode scanning and some of these other kind of cool tips and tricks that we're, we're getting , uh , getting us to do. Sometimes I have to say, I wonder if, if Citrix truly understands kind of what they have, you know, I know the podio team does, but sometimes you just think that maybe they don't pay enough attention to it.

Jordan Felming:

Uh , yeah. I mean, I've spent enough time in the Po in the Citrix headquarters. Um, you know, I think that we, we definitely, there are some people in , um, uh, I've had some conversations that are , maybe I can relate to you off recording. Um, but , uh, you know, I think that there are definitely some people in Citrix who are cheerleaders of podio. Um, but I don't think that it's ever really been understood. And that's because, you know, for, you know, every time if you go to Podio , his website right now, it's like, well, CRM, project management and, and there's no question that probably all of us get our start with podio because we're looking for something that we can't find anywhere else. Um, but the challenge is of course, you know, the challenges that as, as long as , um, as, as we're still trying to shoehorn podio into only being a CRM or only being a project management then then, which is I feel sometimes what Citrix does in their marketing, not the podio team, but Citrix. Um, I think we're missing the biggest and widest opportunity, which is podio as a platform. Um, and , and that is the bit where I think we're just not there yet with Citrix.

Gil Roberts:

That's fair. Well, I think that's obviously we could go on all day about this. So we'll go ahead and wrap our episode for now. Is there anything else that you want our listeners to know, kind of roll the red carpet out for you and just tell them what you got going on?

Jordan Felming:

Ah , so many things. A , we've got a new product for property management , uh , workflow management , uh, in property magic companies that we've launched. And that's going unbelievably well. Uh , really I'm just excited for the podio community. I think it's great that you guys are doing this. Um , I think the more we can get people understanding and excited about Podio, the better. I'd encourage everybody to be active in the workspaces and global flow and some of the other ones. Um, you know, and I'd encourage you know, everybody to , uh, really try and share as much as we can. I think one of the hidden values from a partner perspective , um, you know, I've , I think I, I started the first European partner meet up , uh, three or four years ago , um , which was literally just me saying, Hey, does anybody in Europe fancy getting together for some beers? And, and Citrix went, oh, we'll host that. And we ended up having an amazing day. And we, we did our third one last year and we're going to do a fourth one this year. But one of what that demonstrates is the close relationship that podio has as a product to the two people. I've never had Microsoft and has never bought me a beer. Um, and , and I've never bothered to give a shit about meeting up with anybody from that ecosystem. And yet I, I know for the listeners, those were willing where the meetup was going to be a wow. Well, I don't have that scheduled yet, but , uh, uh , the , the podio partner meetups will be done on the podium partner where workspace as always. Um , we'll put in dates, we'll put in locations. The lie , the problem would be Munich or Copenhagen. We usually do it in Copenhagen. Um, and those there , but they are for polio partners only.

Gil Roberts:

That's fantastic. Now what, what about Sierra based in North America? I know last year there was an attempt to, is there going to be another attempt this year?

Jordan Felming:

Yeah, we'll do one. Um, uh, w w there's no question. We're gonna do a, a North American meetup. Um, it's just a question of where , um, but I will be organizing one in Europe and one in North America this year.

Gil Roberts:

Well, definitely let us know about that and if you need any help, we're, we're here to offer that assistance. Jordan, thank you so much. This has been a just stimulating conversation. I hope our listeners got a lot of value out of this. Um, and , and we just really appreciate you , uh , being on with us. Subscribe. Uh , it is powered by Podio podcast . Is that right? Uh , it's actually called supercharged. Gotcha. Yes .

Jordan Felming:

You'd be charged and a supercharged with Jordan, Samuel Fleming . Uh, and that's, that's who we are.

Gil Roberts:

Subscribe , uh , to Jordan's podcast. You're listening to us. You need to be listening to him. I think our , our content is going to be very complementarity , uh , with each other, especially with you having a lot of interviews. US, we're , we're going to be focused a little bit more on the technical, a lot of, into the API side and , and kind of get nerdy on design. So I think that , uh , any listener is going to get tons of value from both our podcasts. So definitely subscribe and Jordan, thank you so much.

Jordan Felming:

Thanks guys. Great speaking with you .

Gil Roberts:

Thank you everybody for tuning in to that interview. It was a great interview with Jordan, very stimulating for conversation to hear a lot of the same things that we believe here at Ridge consulting as well as the application of a smart phone . Uh , and some of the work that he does through game changers, definitely tune into Jordan's podcast , uh , supercharged by with Gordon Flemming , a hit his subscribe button by your subscribing to him on apple iTunes. Definitely hit our subscribe button as well. It helps out more than you know. Uh, lastly, please, please, please submit your podio gaps. We want to be able to solve those all one of our shows. Um, if not, we've got to dig through the user forms when we'd like to have something a little more relevant. Please submit those either on our Facebook page, linkedin, Twitter, or send us a email or podio message to podcast@brokerageconsulting.com . We want to be able to solve those live and in real time to do so. So please get those in as soon as possible. Uh, Joe Roberts here. Thank you so much for listening to our podcast today.

Speaker 8:

Hi .