Citrix Developer Solutions Podcast

S1E7 - Podio Design for Business 1: "Considerations for Sales & Marketing CRM Solutions"

February 25, 2019 Brick Bridge Consulting Season 1 Episode 7
Citrix Developer Solutions Podcast
S1E7 - Podio Design for Business 1: "Considerations for Sales & Marketing CRM Solutions"
Show Notes Transcript

Podcast Outline – Season 1 – Episode 7 – Podio Design Considerations for Sales & Marketing Solutions

Discussion Outline:

  1. Introduction – Welcome to the Series - Podio Design for Business Types
  2. Topic:  "Podio Design Considerations for Sales & Marketing Solutions"
  3. 1st Discussion: Business Case - Marketing Agency needing a CRM to "install" for clients
  4. 2nd Discussion: Theoretical Solution Work out
  5. Deep Dive: Driving metrics through Podio-based CRM systems and the power of the data
  6. Up Next: 
  7. Audience Engagement: Solving Podio Gaps – Podio Developers and Power users – Submit your gaps!
  8. Outro: SUBSCRIBE and Thank you.

Follow us on social media (@PodcastPodio) to stay up to date on all Podio Podcast news.

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/brickbridge)

Gil Roberts:

Welcome to the Podio Solutions Podcast season one, episode seven. I'm Gil Roberts with me today is our lead developer here at Brick Bridge, Alex Shull.

Alex Shull:

Hello.

Gil Roberts:

Now a principal consultant at Jared Duker.

Jared Duker:

Sorry, I really don't have to pay to stay there through our snapchat.

Gil Roberts:

This podcast is about the design and development on the Citrix podio platform or you can visit it podio@podio.com. We use this podcast to discuss your own experiences with podio as well as the interests . Other interesting topics from the podio is developer community. If you are a podio designer or developer working at an agency, small business enterprise, and you should immediately hit that subscribe button if you have already. Thank you so much for your support. Lastly, before we dive into today's topic, if you have a topic, issue , solution, problem, or anything else you'd like to discuss, we want to know , uh , hit us up on Facebook, linkedin, Twitter, or send us an email or podio message to podcast@brickbridgeconsulting.com. Today's topic is going to be uh another series that we're starting here on our podcast , which is a podio designed for business types. We're going to be touching on podio design considerations for the sales and marketing solution set , uh , particularly around CRMs. Uh, what we'll do in this series is basically just cover some use cases , uh , per industry. Uh , we know that sales and marketing CRM, especially for the podio developer community tends to be one of the most used aspects of podio. Uh , so we wanted to be able to connect with that. We will be doing other industries and other use cases with podio as we go along. We are going to try to keep this more on the design side , uh , for business types so we won't be diving into the technicals as much. Uh, we will have another series a which we'll talk about at the end of this episode that , that's going to touch on that more. So I wanted to open today's show with a business case. Uh , I do a lot of the sales and business development here at Brick Bridge Consulting and I wanted to open up the show with a case from a potential client that we're working with now around the , the CRM and marketing space. And I'll open that up. And then Jared, you and I will , we'll have a quick discussion about kind of what that is. So a client that we're working with are hopefully working with potentially a , is a marketing, a digital marketing and AD agency. Uh , it has some great clients , um, as legitimate in the space , uh , has both local, small and medium size business as well as some national accounts as well. Uh, what they're finding and what we're going to hone in on today. And we hope that a lot of the people listening will also appreciate is, especially in the small business and medium, that local business space , uh , she's having trouble working with them because they don't have CRM systems installed. I know for us there was a bit of a shock when we first started talking to them. Like, how , how could you not? And, uh , you know, one of these clients is actually a big, big companies too. Yeah. No, not , not small one or two person operations, but one of these companies has been around in the area over 150 years. Um , you know, pass through generation to generation and they don't have a customer list . Uh , not, not anything that's readily accessible or the ability to take any metrics.

Alex Shull:

So you can survive as a business like the, but you cannot thrive as a business doing that. Not Against the competition.

Gil Roberts:

It's kind of like flying without gauges, right? I mean, you're , you're flying through the air and you don't, you just don't know where you're going. And it feels random how people show up. Jared, when we were first talking about this, you said an experiential, right? Like we think people are coming from Facebook, you know, somebody mentioned it once. So now everybody that comes through the doors, we,

Jared Duker:

which usually means that you feel that you should spend marketing money in a certain way.

Gil Roberts:

Right. And some of these clients, you know, the , there's commas in the amount of money that they're spending, you know , it's 10, $20,000 a month and they're just, there's no solid way for them to track the return on investment , um, uh , of the marketing and the sales activities that they're doing. Um, one , uh, we're gonna, we're gonna use one example of their clients, which is a, an actual retail jewelry store , um, that it has sales people , right? They're on commission and they , the , in jewelry stores, you've, you've seen them in the mall as you walk by. There's not always a lot of customers in there , right? It's kind of a low volume, high ticket item kind of business.

Jared Duker:

But they're based around customer interaction, relationship management. They want you to feel like you're getting one on one attention when you come up to the counter.

Gil Roberts:

Absolutely. You're going to , I mean, a lot of times where I walked into a jewelry store, it's a hundred dollar bills I'm coming off of, right. I'm not, you know, it's not a $2, I mean like there's thousands, you know, I've, I've spent, you know, $5,000 on a ring right? It's, it's not unheard of for people to spend a 10 , $20,000 on, on vintage jewelry. So, you know, these are, these are high ticket items , um, that really personal relationship selling, I think you hit that on the head.

Alex Shull:

Alot of reputation that goes along with that as well.

Gil Roberts:

Absolutely. And it's, it's mind boggling that their salespeople aren't tracking any of their sales activity. They have a system, it is a , a pos, a point of sale system that they would probably say it's a pos for another reason, but , um, it has transactional data so they know who's bought stuff from them. But there's a lot of, I mean, you've been into jewelry stores where guys are walking in , you look around and you walk away, or I'd be like, Hey, I'll be back in a week. And then you just never show up. And the salesperson never follows up with you. Right? Uh , they don't have any lists for , uh, at least easy list to get to say who are mine . High priced buyers are , who are my buyers that only spend $1,000? Right? Or who when is this guy, they just came into this store and bought a $5,000 necklace. When is his wife's birthday? Every month or every year. Right. So you know, when, when, when are these events that we can kind of reach out to him. Again, they're not tracking any of that .

Alex Shull:

And I think the story there isn't that one of those specific measures as a magic bullet, but the story here is that they can't do any of that. they can't even touch the very, very, very first step of having a real marketing program. And that's a something that podio can solve very quickly. And that's, it's interesting that it is, I think it's pretty well respected in the CRM space, especially for how customizable you can make it. Um, so I'm , I'm surprised it's not actually better known than it is because it can solve this problem very easily .

Gil Roberts:

Yeah, it has that. So coming back to our potential client, which is the marketing agency, they've been hired to do this and they had no ability to explain to the client how many people they've sent to the door because the client's not, you know, it's not like the marketing agency as a person sitting in a chair inside the, the store. Right? I mean, so how else are they going to know without some kind of feedback from their client? And they need to be able to have visibility into that data. So what we've talked to about them to, to round out the case and then we'll dive into a solution workout is building something that's relatively simple, you know, just kind of , uh , lead intake, prospect to client, maybe some accessory information around that that they can prescribe out to their, to their client base when they run into this situation, which unfortunately is a lot of the time, again, especially in a small business and medium sized kind of business space. So we've laid out the case. We have a marketing agency that needs to be able to track their impact on their clients, a sales activity. But the client's not recording any sales activities. So how do they get around there ? So Jared, I would start with what your thoughts are on how to, how to vote.

Jared Duker:

Let's talk about the problems just for a sec. Why ? Why is this hard and why does everyone have the same problem? And the answer to that is a CRM software is something that everyone believes they should do, but no one really knows all the intricacies of it. They make it harder than it actually is. And two , you can find plenty of out of the box solutions, but none of them are going to be for you. It's like ordering a set of clothes without really any other instructions. Calling up a manufacturer or going, I would like a suit. Right. And that's it. That's all they have to go on.

Alex Shull:

Yeah . I'm curious, from your experience, do you think that that's especially true of CRMs or is that it is a specialty . That's my feeling as well

Jared Duker:

Because what we have is a 90% problem out of the box. Salesforce. Um, huge west are going to get you 90% there. But that last 10% is what makes you want to use it because the , the, the prospect to lead to client to sale , this is something that exists in every industry. Even mass market industries go through the process. I'll be at very, very quickly. It's, it's the same but because the small individual fields where it says, you know a, it says hey , we want it to be be, even if it's only a few degrees apart is enough to feel disconnected from the entire process. And so people just don't use it. And what makes podio so great is changing a to B is two button clicks and a couple of keystrokes to put the new answer in.

Alex Shull:

Suddenly the software is following the way that you want to do your work rather than the other way around.

Jared Duker:

And so you can close that 10% gap that prevents a lot of people from really using it. And that's the reason that CRMs fail more than anything else. If you're the org organizational leaders CEO, you can buy all the software you want. If you can't get your people to use it, use it consistently. And actually invest in it themselves. It's going to fail.

Gil Roberts:

And we're talking about salespeople here, right? Like who are notorious. Uh , you know, one of the reasons that they're great sales people is that they're notorious for being kind of rebellious and not afraid to contact people. And one of the last things system, you know , are all they , all the great uh , sales people are not at analogies but no, but the idea is that they tend not to want to write things down.

Jared Duker:

Well, no they are outcome driven frequently commissioned based and filling out paperwork doesn't put dollars in their pocket. Right. We can go , this is also an interesting problem from the standpoint of the client that we're engaging with in the, her problem is that she wants to have a consistent stamp that she can use for clients who all need slightly different stamps just like you're saying. So we , we almost have the CRM core problem in a nutshell where we have to now distill out for her purposes what are you trying to measure for every single one of your clients and then keep the basic work space for that client to those minimum elements that enable that metric. Because even can drive that metric out of the one workspace and you can repeat it. Then you can start aggregating metrics you use to do stuff across workspaces consistently. So I was, pretty much just getting to that. We've got two issues that we want to talk about getting people to use it and closing that last 10% and what you just talked about is closing that last 10% which is what podio does. So well. The other side is getting the users on board. And this is another thing that podio does very well through the integrations with other metrics because the only way while you're going to get salespeople to consistently fill out customer information that lead forms is to demonstrate to them that that action creates tangible increases in their sales metrics. Both of these things aren't data driven and podio can do both.

Alex Shull:

And also do things along the lines of gamification. If you have that sales interaction where you want to like get out the little notifications, all those kinds of things are really easy.

Gil Roberts:

And you know another, another side to this that I always like to point up is, is you got to do it in a way that the salespeople don't feel like you were instituting a system so that you can yell at them, right? Like yeah, we're going to start doing this CRM system to start taking some numbers. Wow. Is it because I'm not selling enough? You know, I

Jared Duker:

Third prize is ? You're fired.

Gil Roberts:

So you know , you want, you want to be able to, to give them a reason to use it. That's both pot, that's very positive in its sense. And going back to what you're talking about Alex, which is the Meta problem, which is this is a marketing agency that's trying to help this client increase their sales. You know, how, how does this third party now enter into the equation? Cause that it's not just the business owner looking for a solution, it's their contractor is telling the business owner that they need to get this, get a solution. Um , the marketing person is concerned about which one they select, right? Like cause some of their marketing activities will get tracked by certain types of CRMs. Some will not write it did , you know , cause the owner might run out and go get the cheapest one is like oh we have to go get a CRM. What's the cheapest available? And then they come back to the marketing contractor and say I can't track social media clicks. I can't, you know , I can't get forms from the website because you have to use wordpress and we don't use wordpress. You know, you guys are using something else. Right. So coming back to that close and that 10% that you're talking about, Jared, that marketing contractor has a 10% but they need to close too because they need certain things for that CRM to do a so that they can run their marketing campaigns and get the metrics that they're looking for, which could be very specific to their clients' needs because they , they're prescribing these types of marketing activities. Does it postcards, is it more Facebook ads, is it Instagram, swipe up ads , you know, there's all kinds of these different things that these marketing agencies can prescribe . So not all CRMs are able to handle that. And that's why we like podio in this situation because it is open and flexible enough to be able to do that.

Jared Duker:

So let's break this down a little bit. We'll talk about how do we use podio and adapt it to meet the needs , the specific needs of the clients and their clients. And then Gil , I want to throw the ball to you a little bit and talk about how you use things like Zapier to do integrations with other marketing things. So what we found is we're 90% there. We could even install from the APP marketplace a, you know, a CRM if template that gets us 90% there. Now we can go one better than that because we've designed a couple of , uh, internal products that we use based on sort of a mass customization system for our various clients. But we still want to do customization. And how do we do that exactly without breaking the core integrity of the product. Because we know that as soon as you click that little modify template button, you can begin doing untold damage to any sort of automations that may be already arranged, particularly if you're handing that power to a client customer who is not one of the designers. And so one of the principles that we always live by is who has admin privileges in a space like that? And usually the answer is, I do write full, full stop. I do. Um, but we can , especially using Sassafras , uh , tools stamp down a single workspace or a series of workspaces that is that template. It is a customer lead flow that allows for prospect to sales opportunity to sales interaction with potentially a customer. Um, informational attachment to it and I'm like a profile. Yup . A sales activity that allows people to record either telephone calls or very frequently we use a direct email to app that is people are sending email engagements out. They can record their time into it. These are things that everyone needs. And then because of the way that cross workspace interactions can happen inside of Sassafras architecture, if the customer needs that last 10% say they have a special business process that can live in an entirely separate workspace that may have admin access to.

Alex Shull:

Yeah, we can do that with Sassaafras it's true.

Jared Duker:

I don't even need to go in and change their customer profile to have the data points that are specific to them. I can use this as an introduction to podio coding 101

Alex Shull:

You can do this without Sassafras. What you're describing, but Sassaafras kind has that model native.

Jared Duker:

Well that's what we were shooting for.

Alex Shull:

Right exactly. That's the problem we resolved

Jared Duker:

The difficulty with cross workspace interaction . That's native to the Podio globiflow tool set. That's why we are expanding it.

Alex Shull:

There's a hierarchy as well.

Jared Duker:

And the reason that's so important is we talked about that permission , we could put everything in one workspace, but it's very probable that if they have admin access to that this is a mass produced product coming back to Podio as a solutions' delivery platform. If I have to give them admin access to the core workspace, they're going to break it sooner or later.

Gil Roberts:

Yeah, absolutely. And she, she at the marketing agency level needs to give this to a dozen plus clients, right? So she needs some type of, she is , she can't go through and maintenance all that when they break stuff

Jared Duker:

And each of them is going to need that core space or workspaces depending on the complexity of the system. And they're going to need customization both inside of that core as well as add up. Add ons are a great way to uh , maintain it or sorry to expand it so that , uh , they can like get close that last 10%. But also we're going to need to change around of fields inside of the core workspaces itself. And this is a problem that I've been wrestling with for a couple of years now and why I'm so happy to have functional patching , uh , available to us now because that one rule I said where I don't give them admin access, I can begin loosening up on that as a Sassafras architecture continues to develop because if they do break something, we can use patching to restore it very, very quickly without having a massive headache of losing their changes and everything else.

Alex Shull:

Well as long as they don't delete fields. We have the restore from a backup.

Jared Duker:

But that's a possibility. We can give our customers more and more power without the support nightmare that comes with trying to maintain your database.

Alex Shull:

It gives us the flexibility to give it to them when they're prepared for it. You know, it means that we can, we don't need to give it to them , a majority of our clients, but if the client is, you know...

Gil Roberts:

Sophisticated.

Alex Shull:

Yeah, yeah .

Gil Roberts:

Enterprise level. I could definitely.

Alex Shull:

Yeah exactly. And there , there are the correct ways to do it. Um, and those are some points where we're going to continue to improve Sassafras is to make sure that we have those right extension points for a , um, you know, create a corporate style though . Um ,

Gil Roberts:

So I want to go back to your point about extensions to the podio platform and kind of what I do for marketing activities. And Yeah , we, we uh, we use podio for every , every bit of our process as much as possible , uh , here at brick bridge. So one of the things we have is our CRM system of course. And then some of the marketing activities that we do are either in podio and of itself or something like a mail chimp , uh , where we can use Zapier to connect that and extend the CRM system on the podio platform. And , and the reason I want to bring that up is because that's exactly what our marketing agency does. She, she uses some of these other cloud based marketing systems, that are very specified. Here's a great one. Lob for postcards you can automatically send out letters and postcards for x cents . Uh, thankster does a handwritten thank you cards automated. Uh , mail chimp is in constant contact. Any whether those are great email one.

Jared Duker:

What you want to feed these though? What do you need or to make stuff like this way?

Gil Roberts:

Uh, what , what she does is either through a marketing campaigns bring leads through the door, so something like a linkedin forums or Facebook lead forms. So that needs to be captured. People filling out those forms. Maybe they clicked on my ad and they fill out the form or they clicked on an ad and went to a website and fill out a form. So we need that into a database so that the salespeople on the floor can pick up a phone and call me. Thanks for swinging by our website and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.

Alex Shull:

Yeah, there are suites of software that are doing what she used to do. It's just that they're very expensive and again, way more than she is.

Jared Duker:

You're also going to get that 90%.

Alex Shull:

Exactly. So was she comes so good at

Gil Roberts:

And what she can do is now take with a podio system because it's agnostic, right? And it doesn't have a bunch of stuff already attached that specific, maybe to an industry, maybe you can maybe go drill to a 95% of the way or something like that. But uh, she can then prescribe, say, well, you don't need lob but you need thanks there because you need to send out thank you cards after somebody buys 10 grand worth of stuff from you. You need mail chimp. But what's not do clicks in for text messaging. You know , your clients don't want, don't want to have the hassle of text messaging. We've talked to them, you've talked to them in the store and people don't want to text . They would like to have emails though, right? Especially as jewelry. Buy something that's really nice for your wife. It's a gift and it's going to be a few weeks. You don't want them texting your phone saying, Hey, thanks for your jewelry purchase. You know , this was put that into an email or something so that she can , uh, and from the marketing agency standpoint can prescribe different mixtures. Even if she had two different jewelry stores. Um, one store, Doug may have one kind of specialty. This particular one we're talking about, they get a lot of antique pieces from the states that are one of a kind. So they want to be able to have events where they bring people in cause they , they kind of auction them off a little bit as a purchase from these estates or Kinda consigned with some of these estates where other jewelry stores, you know, they don't have that kind of is , you know, it's closer to the Kay jewelers model was very retailing . Right. So they wouldn't have something like an event bright where they're setting up events for people to come in and look at this antique stuff. You know, this , uh, this store has been around over 150 years. So they have built these relationships with auction houses to get some of these very, classic pieces.

Alex Shull:

All of those integrations of to the podio central system, that kind of like is the repository for all the marketing efforts that she delivers to her clients .

Gil Roberts:

That's correct.

Alex Shull:

Then all of those integrations back into those podio workspaces are gonna be slightly different in terms of what data you're pulling back or what data you're pushing out to be . No one on how you're doing it. And so the idea is that your , your core system is one that represents the CRM that her customers don't have or imports data from a CRM . Maybe they do , that's the core system. And then you have a peripheral space that, that weren't peripheral apps in this case, that track the integrations or how would , are you talking about a situation where you then use globiflow or Sassaafras, um , as it were to make calls where, where do the integrations happen?

Gil Roberts:

Yeah, so a lot of times I just working something out. So let's say we get a w we'll do an easy example. So let's say you get a list, like a bio on people can purchase these lists and these are buyers at tend to buy expensive things. They're luxury buyers. You don't listing email addresses, telephone numbers in a legitimate channel. Maybe they've signed up for something or whatever. Uh , so that can come, you know, so now we have this excel file. What do we do with it? Where are we going to jam it into? Right? Well , we can put it into podio now. She's already given them the CRM and the landing space for this buyer's list. And then based on certain business processes that we set up, either in Sassafras or globiflow at whatever we're using integrity, I can do this as well. Uh, when the list goes in, it can fire off all these. Okay. You would say it's 5,000 people, these 2,500 or are ultra luxury buyers. So we're going to send them an event bright to the, into our next, a unique piece kind of event . Right? And then these buyers are a high end buyers, but they don't typically buy luxury thing . So we're going to go, we're going to go to lob and we're going to send them a personalized letter and she can just jam lists in there. She's already built out, prescribed with talking with her client. This ability to, to have this and we just push data into the front end.

Alex Shull:

So for every single CRM that she pushes out, jewelry store or not, we can see the customers and we can see the campaigns and we can see some kind of impact measure though if it's hubspot that's just dependent upon the client. Those are the things that are going to push data back into campaigns back into the , the ultimate measure of the impact from the campaigns .

Gil Roberts:

I think. I think you bring up an even better point, which is some clients she has do, they do have a CRM systems that are actually full. Crm is not just quickbooks where your transactional information is , um, we can actually work on , you know , podio can work along side of that CRM. We're , podio is kind of the central nervous system. That's the backbone for all the data is, and they can continue to use their current CRM.

Alex Shull:

And that's the beauty of it. Because whether or not you have that first point of record, podio can live as the first point is that as the source of that data or we can ingest it , it really doesn't care. You can start that process anywhere . So yeah, you integrate it and it looks the same whether you're a customer has an advance your room or not.

Gil Roberts:

So a lot of the customers she deals with don't have a CRM. So I'll keep with that example. So we pushed out all these event invites, we pushed out all these postcards or personalized letters to lob and let's say now we can have the salespeople watch people come the door. Oh, hi, welcome to the store. Uh, how did you hear about is , oh, I got this. Oh, what is your name? Click, click, click. Oh, Mr. Smith . Um , and pull them up directly in podio or even an integration with the POS system. It supports or QR scanner. We can do that. Yeah, absolutely. Hey, you got, you got an email from us bringing this car car, bring it in or scan a QR scanner, you've got an email from us, whereas your coupon code, right? Yeah , there's a lot of possibilities of tracking campaign activity back. I want to touch on that. So one of the great things about podio is call rail, right? Like call rail can give you a whole bunch of different telephone numbers. You can put those telephone numbers on different kinds of ads. You can have a telephone number that only goes on, you know, Facebook ad number one of January 19 , uh , ran through x day through x date. And we can track through Zapier Sassafras any of these other integration platforms, how many phone calls at that single telephone numbers is seizing thought that telephone number away . And the next day I gets one or have multiple telephone numbers. You can put them on billboards on the side of the road. You can specialize the email addresses so we can get all the metrics off of a particular ad. Very specifically this one ad out of 10 that we ran at the same time. And Go, that person came to the front door and walked in and bought something and we'd go this Facebook ad we ran two Facebook ads at once. We got the same number of leads. But people that responded to the first day I bought 10 times the amount of stuff. Right. Why did that group of people respond to that ad? Even though we had the exact same number of people respond to the second ad but they didn't buy anything at all. You know , we can learn more about the customer.

Jared Duker:

What you're describing to me sounds like PPC, your Google analytics that were used to seeing in ecommerce being expanded to physical retail locations.

Alex Shull:

Yeah, I think it's fair , fair to point out the, this A, B testing approaches integrated into some of these other platforms. But the entire point that we're making and the client has been making for us is that even if she uses these , uh , these other platforms, they only reach 90% and so podio integrates all of the benefits of these other platforms, but let's you get the full view across those systems, especially if you're not using hubspot to send out postcards because you can't send a postcards with hubspot. Right. And so this is that , that integration point where it's flexible enough to pull in all the data to perform all the integrations.

Gil Roberts:

And even if you do something like Zapier, hubspot to lob, which you can do that, right? You can do, but it doesn't track, now you got to it . It doesn't track to a centralized system. It doesn't, it doesn't come back to the spine.

Alex Shull:

This is what a lot of people would use salesforce for and Nolan will do use salesforce for it . It has to be this, the, the central system of the other ways don't have, they're living off on those spreadsheet right now.

Gil Roberts:

Yes. Yeah. Actually, yeah. This particular client I had , it has an excel spreadsheet that they just have information in that the owner has access to and not the sales floor because it also has financial information in there. So the sales people , again, especially with, I liked the jewelry store example because you have salespeople on commission standing in your store and it's not inside a mall or anything. This is a freestanding store. People that drive there and walk in the door are there for a purpose. They're not browsing typically. Right. You have sales people standing there doing nothing. Yeah, right. They could be making phone calls, they could be reaching out to prior customers. They could just be calling and saying thank you for your past purchases. We don't want you to buy anything. Just just thank you. You know, just doing something.

Alex Shull:

Representing your company in some way . For sure.

Gil Roberts:

Yeah, so it, it's lost effort. Yeah. Because for the only reason is because they're not tracking the data and we we ,

Alex Shull:

Yeah. I think with the , in these cases where the data is out there and it's just locked up and these are, there is an opportunity to go to your declines , say let's activate that data for you and get it working for you. Because that's, that's the goal of a lot of businesses that they have that data in there and they haven't really activated it. And when you put it in podio and you are able to tie it in with other systems that you were able to get different views of it, you're really just, you know, putting into , to use for you. So that's , that's what she's gonna be able to do.

Jared Duker:

I want to just throw in a pro tip real fast because I know people don't use this feature all that often, but tags in podio is absolutely perfect for this , uh, where you could tag a customer file with the campaigns that they were targeted for without having to do complex , uh , category design on individually. You don't have to anticipate what future campaigns were beat would be. You can just throw tags on files which are then filterable and you could design metrics on your dashboard based on tags and outcomes such as the great feature that's already in Podio does not get the attention that it really deserves.

Gil Roberts:

That's, that's fair. And then for her, we'll come back to the meadows. A marketing agency, one of the driving force is not just to give success to her clients, right? Getting them to do the things that they're supposed to be doing and then her tracking her impact with them. She needs a clear picture of her data across all her clients so that when she goes and makes the sale to a new client, she can go, look what I'm doing for my portfolio of clients. Right. The , the, the metadata off of every , all of her activities. There's not going to be a CRM for her that does that. Right. Like, or you would have to tie, I mean, how many of these apps and everything else would you have to do to tie, you know , 30 clients worth of CRM is back to a central database and all that . All the hassle. That would come with something like that. So having, giving them something that's standard backbone allows her to easily pull matrixx from so that she can present her own sales case to the new client. I think that comes through to our final discussion today, which is our deep dive. Uh , we're gonna be talking about it driving metrics through podio based CRM systems in the power of data. So Alex, we're going to , we're going to jump into what that data means from a CRM perspective. How that, how that interacts inside of Podio and what's, let's just kind of talk through measuring and tracking and why that's important.

Alex Shull:

Well, I think the, the , um, you know, the discussion we've had today kind of gives a , a lot of examples as to why it can be important because obviously you, you, you can't manage what you don't measure. That's , uh , you know, we've all heard that. And so the, the , the key in the design phase of Podio is to design for the measures that you're , um, that are important to your business. And so you have an opportunity in podio to really see how the work flows through the different systems. And that's why a lot of attention , um, is invested in our practice up front from the work first perspective on making sure that you're going to be able to get the metrics you need on the back end . We have two basic approaches that Jared's developed that you know, provide different technical strengths and weaknesses. And one is where we have um, essentially what a single accumulating card that aggregates critical data and you can drive, you can drive KPIs and things like that , um , directly out of a , um, a , uh , an application that serves that purpose. And the other way is to , um, drive through the aggregation of records, not on, onto a single item. And, but both of those ways of designing podio lets you get good real time measures as changes occur in Podio, you can update those metrics and really respond to them and you can do all sorts of things based upon the events of those metrics being updated as well. So it's, it's a very powerful system. As long as you go into it with the vision of what you're trying to measure, it's much harder to have to restructure system after the fact and add in a certain change to a data model or a new , um, decimal point or whatever it is to improve your measuring . So the more thought you put under the front end, the more experience you have an industry to know what measures are important, the better you're going to be able to bake that in. And that, that, that's a, I think the, the , the key point that , um, that I would say it's CRMs are just a case in point because being able to measure through them is where the value from CRM comes from.

Jared Duker:

I really can't add much to that, Alex, except for one point. Which is in 2019 um, availability of data is no longer problem that faces most businesses today. The problem is data organization and data management data is everywhere. Computers create mountains of it just by day to day operations. But coming up with that effective data Schema that , uh, brings just interaction events into a comprehensive narrative that can be understood by human beings for the process of effective decision making, which is what we're trying to get to here. Right?

Alex Shull:

Link things back to the events in your business that caused certain outcomes.

Jared Duker:

It would be intent of taking an action upon it, not just, you know, we could sit in our ivory towers and go, but that's not why we're sitting around this time.

Gil Roberts:

Absolutely not.

Jared Duker:

And what podio has one other great advantage for this, which is the exercise of putting together a relational database that sketches out a process that we are hoping to enact in our businesses, clarifies that process. It is where the organization in that data comes from because you think through it as you're building your apps or expanding upon an APP, a selection that you've already built previously. That's the kernel of that organization that allows comprehension of such a large and the intricate system. And the fact that you can do this by dragging blocks around and putting relationship fields in an APP allows regular business managers to begin creating conceptional data models. That would be, well, the grounds of a business consultant like myself.

Alex Shull:

Yeah, yeah, exactly.

Gil Roberts:

It's that , uh, I mean, it's very approachable for them to be able to codify their business process into the software. Take some measurement. You know, I have the employees use it, run it through the , through the battlefield, and then come back and go, are we doing the right thing? Is this marketing campaign? Is Facebook, which we heard one person say they came here because of Facebook and now we've been spending $5,000 a month in there is that reality is that, you know, when we come to find out that was the only person that came from Facebook. Right and we've spent thousands upon thousands of dollars. Uh , and it's just on a procession that isn't true.

Alex Shull:

Yeah. And you know, it's interesting. So sorry to interrupt you but uh , I watch shark tank that's a obviously a popular show you here in the states, but you know, where there's a group of investors who are evaluating proposals and one of the questions they're always grill the investors. I mean the uh , the business owners about you know, the numbers behind your business and what are the key metrics that they're all very interested in for , um, people who are retailing is the cust caught them the cost of customer acquisition. What does your customer acquisition costs? And I like the idea of if you're , if we're delivering a solution, a CRM solution for what is ultimately a retail business of thinking in advance. Like is that a question that they can actually, if they're looking at marketing, is that a question you're going to be able to answer at the end of the day? What will your customer acquisition cost ? Because if you can't get that out of your system in , in a reasonably short order of time it's probably not doing, you know, for at least for the kid. If that's true, how vital that is for the prospective of shark tank . Your CRM isn't doing what you needed to do.

Gil Roberts:

That's a , that's an accurate assessment because the CRM ends at the end of this sales process. Right. And what we'll get into future episodes where we'll talk about moving into the operational side, those, that tends to be extremely specific. You want to talk about specificity that that's down to the business, right? Every business has a secret sauce. So, but for the sales activity portion, understanding how much it costs me to bring that one person in there and how much they purchase , we can get to that level of granularity with podio and we did that.

Alex Shull:

And our client will be able to go to her customers and say, look, when I started changing the campaign over to here, here's what happened to your cost of customer acquisition. That's a good measure that she could deliver to every single one of her retail clients if they're, if they're, if that's a , you know, if they provided that data.

Gil Roberts:

Yeah. And we've got to have some kind of basis for them to be able to do that. And right now she's showing up in these situations. Coming full circle here. She wants to be able to go, I ran this Facebook campaign and your sales went up by x and be able to state that with total clarity. Uh, not just because something random happened. Um , she needs access to the data. There's sales data. Well, if you're not , if your sales data is your credit card system and deposits in your bank account, there's no telling why numbers move around one week it'll be up, one week will be down when we can , you know , and there's no rhyme or reason or any kind of longterm trend. Yeah, absolutely. You know, and if they could hire and uh , you know, October and she'd go look at all the sales I gave you over November and December and then, and then when, you know, it's just, there's no transparency and , and where, where the numbers are coming from and that's the power of the data at the end of the day. And that drives her as a marketers business decision that drives the business owner's decision about, you know , a retaining continuing to retainer as well. You know, if you want to think about it that way, her own performance to prove that, hey, when we renew this contract for me to be your marketing agency, here's what I've done for you. You've given me a dollar in budget and I've created x number of dollars in sales for you and this is working out so you should renew my contract. Right. So she needs something as well. All right. Uh, any other, anything else to add? I think we've done that. So from a design perspective, we've tackled a kind of sales and marketing solutions here in podio. To summarize , just using podio is a backbone for a lot of data and the ability to do integrations off of that , uh, allows us to collect data and make better business decisions and that , uh , it's customization and integration points and its openness and, and just being agnostic as a platform is why it's better than a lot of other CRM solutions that are out of the box. Um, so, we'll, in our show today , uh , thank you so much again for listening. We'll have some more episodes coming up where we dive into different yeah , uh, industries or business processes on this segment from a design standpoint. I want to touch on quickly, we'll also have a series coming up next week where we'll touch on more of the technical standpoint of podio and dive into that as well. If you are in Podio, designer, developer, you like what you're listening to, please, please, please hit that subscribe button. We also need people to submit more Podio gaps for solving podio gaps series here on the podcast. So please hit us up on Facebook, linkedin, Twitter, or send an email or Podio, message to podcast@brickbridgeconsulting.com. That's B R I C K ....We can, you know we've been kicking this around. Do you want to talk about that? So , uh , we're actually going to be opening up a podio space. We'll have the link in the show notes for you to be able to join we are going to have some user forms on there for our listeners. And also the ability to , uh , put in those gaps. But until then , I again, it's a brickbridgeconsulting.com B R I, C K, B R, I D G E consulting.com and we will talk to you all next week. Subscribe. Thanks.