Podio Solutions Podcast

S1E10 - Interview with Andrew Cranston of Boost PM And GameChangers

March 18, 2019 Brick Bridge Consulting Season 1 Episode 10
Podio Solutions Podcast
S1E10 - Interview with Andrew Cranston of Boost PM And GameChangers
Chapters
Podio Solutions Podcast
S1E10 - Interview with Andrew Cranston of Boost PM And GameChangers
Mar 18, 2019 Season 1 Episode 10
Brick Bridge Consulting

Show Outline:

  1. Introduction to interview
  2. Topic: – Interview with Andrew Cranston, CTO at GameChangers [http://www.WeAreGameChangers.com]
  3. 1st Discussion: Andrew's background and a discussion of his progress as a Podio solution developer.
  4. 2nd Discussion: Boost PM [http://www.boostpm.com] and its technical philosophy
  5. 3rd Discussion: Don't be afraid to move from Globiflow into other tools like ProcFu, SaaSsafras, and the Podio API itself!
  6. Audience Engagement: Solving Podio Gaps – Podio Developers and Power users – Submit your gaps!
  7. Outro: SUBSCRIBE and Thank you.

Follow us on social media (@PodcastPodio) to stay up to date on all Podio Podcast news.

Support the show (http://www.brickbridgeconsulting.com/podcast)

Show Notes Transcript

Show Outline:

  1. Introduction to interview
  2. Topic: – Interview with Andrew Cranston, CTO at GameChangers [http://www.WeAreGameChangers.com]
  3. 1st Discussion: Andrew's background and a discussion of his progress as a Podio solution developer.
  4. 2nd Discussion: Boost PM [http://www.boostpm.com] and its technical philosophy
  5. 3rd Discussion: Don't be afraid to move from Globiflow into other tools like ProcFu, SaaSsafras, and the Podio API itself!
  6. Audience Engagement: Solving Podio Gaps – Podio Developers and Power users – Submit your gaps!
  7. Outro: SUBSCRIBE and Thank you.

Follow us on social media (@PodcastPodio) to stay up to date on all Podio Podcast news.

Support the show (http://www.brickbridgeconsulting.com/podcast)

Gil Roberts:

Welcome to the Podio Solutions Podcast season one episode ten. I'm Gil Roberts and with me on. This interview today will be Jarett Duker our p rincipal consultant, here at Brick Bridge. This podcast is about the design and development on t he CITRIX P odio platform. You will find it at podio at podio.com u ses podcast t o discuss her own experiences with podio as well as other interesting topics from the p odio developer community. If y ou're a podio designer, developer working at an agency, small business or enterprise, you should immediately hit that subscribe button if you have already. Thank you so much for your support for we dive in today's interview with Andrew Cranston of boost pm and we are game changers. If you have a topic issue, solution, problem or anything else you'd like to discuss, we want to know about it, please hit us up on o ur Facebook, linkedin, Twitter, or send us an email or podio message at podcast@brickbridgeconsulting.com u h, what we're going to do today is go right into the interview. Again, Jared and I are on this call with Andrew w really dive into some great topics when it comes to API work as well as some of the integrations. And the boost pm product and how they u sed podio to be able to solve that for property. U h, so I'll make a solution for property managers. Excited to be able to let you guys listen to this interview is a really, I had a lot of questions of Andrew and Oh, just felt l ike it was very invigorating conversation. U h, definitely gets a little technical. U h, but I think this is super approachable for the podio developers out there that are, that are really proficient with globiflow but looking to go to the next level. So we'll get right into the interview. Thanks. All right . We're here with Andrew Cranston of we are game changers the Cto, uh , that has been there for, what is that about three years now? Is that right?

Andrew Cranston:

Yeah , I've been working with game changers for just over three years now.

Gil Roberts:

Fantastic. And , uh, let's just dive into your background, Andrew. Uh , talk about some of the technical sides of podio that you've grown to understand and love and, and kind of how that started and where that came from.

Andrew Cranston:

Sure. Well, I've been working , uh, with podio on the regular now for just over three years. Um, and, and obviously , uh, we started out, Jordan and I started there together on another project and it kind of spun off into this podio consulting. Um, and we've, we've worked with a few clients who are , you know, very simple systems and then started to work with more and more people who were doing more complex things. Um, and I was doing a lot of work, just started globiflow directly, like most people would start. Um, and then over the past year , year and a half, basically since the birth of procfu, which has become sort of a , a sort of pivotal piece of our developments , um, I've kinda gotten more and more interested in, in , uh , you know, PHP and a direct programming. And I've written a few integrations of my own , um, and working on a few products a and stuff for clients. So for three years, you know, podio, but a really deep into sort of the back end development of what the podio API is capable of for about the last year. And a half

Gil Roberts:

What challenges are you finding when you're, when you're working with a podio API or are you seeing maybe limitations or is it just a matter of creativity?

Andrew Cranston:

Yeah , I think it's , um, I like , I always like to talk about things in terms of the outcomes and whenever I'm dealing with a client , you know , uh, it's, it's, it's nice to, sometimes you look at the beginning, I do maze this backwards is what I'm trying to say. I always try to look at exactly what I'm looking, what I want to see in the end, and then I sort of visualize it from that point backwards. So , um, you know, the Podio API is brilliant. I mean it really is the , um, it's, it's one of the crown jewels of the software because it lets us do so much. And one of the biggest benefits of the podio API and how open it is, is it's so easy to integrate with other systems. And , uh , we've spent a lot of time in the past year or so , um, integrating with a number of external systems because, you know, especially for systems that are, that are , uh, can be accessed for free. You know, I always like to push mailgun on developers who are looking for email solutions because mailgun we'll give you a certain amount of emails for free. And it's a really super easy API to work with. So as an example , um, you know, connecting the podio wave , using the podio API to connect podio to other systems where you don't necessarily want to spend your time rewriting the Bible you know? Mailgun is an awesome SMTP email transactional service, so you could build your own, but , but why bother? You know, like, let's just, let's just use the API to connect to these external systems that do their jobs really well so that the end user, the client can live inside podio under one roof and access everything they need to access but don't have to, you know, maintain set of logins in order to do their daily work.

Gil Roberts:

Well , we liked that level of kind of simplification that podio does provide kind of a central nervous system. And then, and then the addition of something like a mail gun or a mail chimp or any of these other ones, we can, we can just use those products that are off the shelf better to provide that deeper level of functionality. Right. So that , that it's, you know, we're not remaking wheels. I like how you, how you said that are rewriting the Bible. It's , it's already things are already out there. Um , at this point it's 2019. Uh , we just need to wire them together.

Andrew Cranston:

That's right. Yeah. And you see now we've been doing a lot of work , uh , in the recent past for, you know, real estate folks and property managers. And there are certain softwares that keep coming back over and over again. One of them might be lob. You know, there's a lot of people who are using lob for direct mail purposes. And , uh, you know, there's some podio partners like a bill caravana who's , who's out there sort of , um, uh , doing the good work, getting people, you know , uh , more , um, more educated on how to use these tools. Um, and it's , uh , it's exactly the same situation. You know lob, does a good job at what it does and a , and you could spend your life sort of rebuilding something that you can just, you can just grab onto and hook into your own podio system. Um, and, and the sky's the limit really. I mean, I've been, I've been spending a lot of time , uh, working with Apis and discovering, you know, which ones work best with podio in which, which was , which ones don't, you know. And most of the top API's on the market, you know, things like Dropbox or share file or lob Twillio uh , click send for SMS Mailgun mail chimp , mandrill like all of these external softwares that do jobs really well, actually have pretty decent API's . And a note on Api as well. For those people who are sort of, you know, had been working in globiflow for a really long time and um, and are looking for that next level. Um, you know, working with Api's as not a really super complex thing. Once you get to know some of the verbiage that you need, you know, learning what Jason is and learning how to send an http request, these sort of basic knowledge bits keep coming back over and over and over again. So, uh, for those developers out there who are looking for, you know, to get to that next level, I would invite you all to go after us. You know, there's, there's so many more, so many materials out there that globiflow um, forum has been, and I'm sure I'm not the only one who said this or would say this, but that forum and that community have been absolutely pivotal in my development as a developer. Um, and being able to ask questions and I, you know, I'm, I've been a member of many online communities and honestly this is the best one a person could ever hope to be a part of. You know, we see as champions out there who are helping every day. Um, and I try, I'm just trying to give back to the community that gave back that gave so much to me. Uh , and it's amazing. You know, don't, don't be ever be afraid to ask the community questions cause you will definitely get an answer.

Gil Roberts:

I have to agree. I mean we see a lot of activity over there every day. I think from some of the other ones that our developers are in a , you know, you ask a question a lot of times it never gets answered right? Where over in the globiflow community. Even in podio partners channel people are just friendly and helpful. Um , I think that that's key is you said for your development. It's been great. A knowledge base for us. We , we tend to lurk a little bit in there, but we can, we grab a lot of information. One of the reasons we wanted to do this podcast was way to give back to the community. Um, as well. Um, Jarett, do you have any questions about what , when we talk about integrations or designed for Andrew?

Jarett Duker:

I've got quite a few questions, but he's really on a roll right now. I do want to talk more about , uh , how he first got into using podio is a scalable solutions platform. That's definitely kind of our hot button topic , uh , for the last couple of weeks in which is exactly what boost pm is as I understand are or will be very, very shortly. And they're just onboarding their first clients right now.

Andrew Cranston:

Yeah, that's right. We , we've, we've got a stable system ready to go and um, and it's kind of neat because one of the coolest things I like about boost. So I guess, you know, not to get too far ahead. So boost is a software package that we are launching to help property management companies handle the automation of their business. So we've come to learn that there are a lot of systems out there that handle, you know, property management information. Some of them are like app folio property wear um , some people have been using a software called process street and , and these , these , these softwares do, you know, again, looking at the things that , um, that people can use that do their jobs really well so that you don't necessarily have to reinvent the Bible and um , you know, app folio and property where have really strong sort of financial aspects to them, banking aspects, being able to track payments and, and, and how things work in bank accounts. So that stuff is very, you know, regulation heavy and you know, the API APIs or are kind of a nightmare. So, you know, property management companies use these softwares because they're taking advantage of these things that they absolutely need to work. But the, the negative aspect of some of these softwares is that they don't really have any kind of automation to them. And their API APIs are a little bit limited. We're actually working with some of these softwares to try to get a little bit more out of their API so we can do things. But I mean the good news is obviously we can always grab things out of one software and like a CSV or an excel file and pop them into podio and we , we actually have some tools provided to us, you know, via the Podio Api and things like procfu to handle these imports for us so the user doesn't have to spend their lives, you know , doing imports because nobody wants to do that. So because the software's are lacking a lot of automation tools and because they don't have very strong APIs that can interact with things like Zapier or Integra Mat , which is really the first place that people would really go for if they were looking for extra added automations or, or pushing information from one system to another. We've gone ahead and built our own sort of system that models . After some of the data the user will find an app folio, things about like tenants and property managers and properties and units and things like that. And then also taking over and being able to drive the business forward with from both a community and automated communication standpoint and a task management standpoint. So being able to automatically send out communications on one off basis or over a series of, a period of time say you will , you would want to set an email to go to a person 30 days from now. So you tell the system you want it to go, the data goes and then on that day it just happens. And let's say you want to chain these events together. So trying to put as much , um, as much onus on the system to do as much as it can automatically without you having to , uh , without you having to manage it as , as much as you would or , or having no automation and people who are doing things like out of excel, which drives me crazy. You know , if anybody's running their business out of excel, I would recommend you look at something else. Cause uh , excel was the worst collaborative tool that you could imagine. I spent so many years in the corporate world working in excel spreadsheets on a shared drive and opening it up and saying, you know, Debbie has already, is , has this spreadsheet open, you know, like So the cloud is a , is definitely a huge benefit. So, so boost is , um, is something that we built in order to , uh, to try to deal with these issues, these, these, you know , a communications process management and basically having the system smart enough to tell you when something is happening that you need to know about it gets into your purview and whatnot. And another cool thing that we've designed on boost as we built this sort of separate , um, uh , application. It's not something that you spend a lot of time and we don't want people to out of podio. You want to spend your time in Podio, but there are certain things that you want out of podio that are sometimes difficult to develop. I think most developers who work in podio might find some, some difficulty with things like, you know, one of the most basic concepts is your , you're in one item in Podio, you're in a place and you want to create another item somewhere else, but you want to have that second item , um, automatically related to a number of items or relationships where you currently are. So for instance, if I'm in a property's APP or I'm in a contracts APP and I want to create a task or something else , um, and I want to be, I want to have that new item related to some of the things where I currently am. You know, we've built a number of different solutions for this buttons and globiflow that automatically create items and then, you know, post comments , uh, that take you to those items or updating relationship fields or people who are using markdown tables. You know, there are a lot of solutions, but none of them are really, you know, relying on calculation fields can be dangerous. As we all know, anybody who's spent any time in Podio, the calculation fields are really brilliant, but they can be a little bit dangerous , um , to rely on when you need them in an instance. So we've, one of the coolest things that I really like about the design of boost is we built a series of links , um, that the user gets presented in the context of where they are. And these links send the user off into a , um, uh , the application , uh, but they don't actually see anything. What it does is in the background, we'll grab all the information about that related item. It will create a new item and then it will automatically redirect the user to the new item with all of the relationships in tact. And another reason why we went this way is because all of the methods in which we have , um, are not necessarily mobile friendly. You know , um, one, one of my biggest thought experiments over the past, you know , six months specifically is how can we make the mobile podio mobile experience better? Because it is, you know , uh, I'm not, I'm an android user. Um, and that's probably a contentious conversation for some people, but , um , the podio APP and the android environment , uh , is missing some markdown elements that I think are available in the IOS App. I'm not really sure cause I'm not an Ios user, so, so , uh , you know, I have podio on my iPad, but I don't really use it that often. Um, so to try to bridge this gap, you know, to be able to be in the mobile APP, click on a link, it just pops you out into chrome or safari or wherever we happen to be just to do a little bit of logic and then automatically brings you back into the podio APP, focused on the new item that you just asked for. It's actually pretty cool and it's, it's really cool to watch it go on your phone. Um, and that is one of the key aspects I think that we're trying to do with boost is, is, is take all of these pitfalls that we all see as podio developers, whether it's the reliance on calculations fields or timing issues or race conditions , uh , the podio mobile experience, and try to roll all this together to give the user an experience that they can pretty much guarantee consistency across all platforms. Um , and that's one of the coolest things that we've seen come out of our, come out of our a development on boost.

Gil Roberts:

Yeah. I think that, and it's so fascinating because, you know, as we do product packages and the idea of a podio being a solutions platform , uh , for larger applications, that user experience is so important because at the end , for our clients, at least, I'm sure this is probably universal, they , they really don't care how the sausage is made, right? They just need the experience that they're looking for and something that's relatable. Unfortunately, we do compete with stuff that's off the shelf, that's completely custom development. Uh, and then they're there, even if it's old or antiquated. They're , they're just used to kind of having this seamless experience. And , and , and I think that's so cool you guys have done where it'll kind of take them off site , do the processing and you can even give them a load screen or whatever, you know, whatever that they need while that's going on and then bring them right back into the podio application. I think it's , uh , a sorely needed feature. You know, we're looking at leveraging some of the embed fields that are inside of podio as well. Do we have a similar kind of process? So, so I think that's so cool that you guys have been able to tackle that head on. Is there any other kind of innovate other innovations that you guys have uncovered during your, either time with boost or some of your other projects?

Andrew Cranston:

Well, I mean, and I , not to beat a dead horse, but I mean, I do love, I do love , um, how, how podio can play so nicely with so many other systems, like the majority of external software, like SAS systems that people would use, you know, things like Dropbox or sheriff off or management email communications or, or any other, you know, most of these softwares do have API's . And, and I, and I understand that reading when , when you start from scratch and you pull up a set of API documentation, even the podio API documentation and you start low , you know, reading up on, on what's going on and a , and what you have to do. Um , once you get into it a little bit and you start working with it, you can really find how easy it is to actually do things in Globiflow using only the remote post get action . So that's an action that tends to be hidden away from a lot of people because they don't see a need for it or they're not, you know, they're not a brave enough or courageous enough to necessarily go after it. But you can do a lot out of globiflow. You'd be surprised, you know, one, one of the things that continues to surprise me about globiflow is , um, it is essentially a PHP scripting engine. You know, we, we don't necessarily talk about global flow outside of the context of, okay, yeah, we use it to create podio items and we use it to update podio items and assign tasks and all those basic triggers. It is in its , you know, it is at its core a podio software. I mean that because it's built on the podio Api and that's what it's meant to do. But even when you look in the, in the , the frame of accustomed variable or a set of custom variables and the remote posts get doc action, you can actually do a lot in globiflow that has nothing to do with podio at all. You know, fire a Web Hook, fire, a signal to a Podio, to a globiflow web hook that runs a flow that can collect information from different places, irrespective of podio or not. Um, and then fire it off somewhere else with just a little bit of knowledge. You know, one thing I would invite other device , you know, developers to do again is maybe to learn a little bit more about PHP cause, cause globiflow is natively a PHP environment and things that we use every day . You know, people are always asking, how do I do this? And then you throw them the date function, the PHP date function and be like, okay, this works. But did they really understand what they were doing? So they really understand, you know, there's a lot of people who were just looking to copy and paste code that works and, and go, which is great. Um, but for those of you who are looking for that, you know, that next level really understanding what is going on and globiflow what do these functions actually do, where do they come from? And learning a little bit more about PHP can can give you out a new perspective on a lot of different things. Um, and uh , and custom variables are super powerful and I'm finding new ways to draw their power every day. Uh , the more I experiment with, with the custom functions and doing, you know, more PHP functions, it saves me a lot of time. People who do like seven or eight if then statements in a row could all be combined into one custom variable with the right knowledge, with the right power. Um, so, so globiflow continues to inspire and surprise me even outside the scope of podio. Um , which is great. You know, it's a , it's such a powerful tool and procfu obviously is adding to that power as well. And one thing that I just just one mentioned about procfu when we're talking about Api Apis is some APIs require a heavier level of authentication. You know, some like the mail gun Api for instance, we'll just let you pass in a token in your call and then you're good to go. Other APIs want to go through this other longer process which is called oauth two . Um, and that's like a handshake that takes place to ensure that you actually are who you say you are. And then you, you know, and procfu does all of that brilliantly for you as well. So , um, so that is something that has been a true passion of mine for about, you know, the past year or so as I've been developing my own, you know, solutions that really deal with a lot of external services. Um, and , uh, and it's, it's, it's, it's very fascinating to see what globiflow is capable of. And I always love having those deep level conversations. Uh, you know, with a real nerds on a , on the forum.

Gil Roberts:

Jarett, I know you and I use podio and with globiflow daily, obviously as our listeners have heard in our other episodes, we have our own custom flow engine. Um, we love Globiflow. We love the addition of procfu too. I think that that Weber does it even better. We find it's a wonderful prototyping to it . You just really can't beat that. And I, I , I think that Jarett, you and I need to explore more of what Andrew's talking about here. When we think about like off podio processing via Globiflow. I mean that, that's something that I , that has it really percolated in my mind until this conversation. So I appreciate that so much, Andrew . That I think that's, that's a great insight for those that are looking to build more robust solutions for even individual clients as well as product based solutions on the platform. Because podio doesn't do everything right. Like it's not the everything, everything and nor do you want it to do everything or recreate everything inside of it. Um, I think it's so important that people look around and go, Hey, this is where the users have a central point and then we can go in and kind of steal or take some of this other functionality from other programs by tying it to the platform.

Andrew Cranston:

Yeah, I think that, you know, obviously , um, a lot of us , uh , who , who know you , uh, have a deeper insight into, you know, the, the dark recesses of podio. You know , folks who had never even visited like a developer tab or don't know what a field id is, you know, but for those of us who are sort of under, under the , uh, the , the, the deeper aspects of it, I think that there's always things that we wished we had. You know, there's obviously a lot of things about podio that I wish were different. You know, one, one, one example that's bothering me lately is , uh , you know, you have a relationship field that that points to items and another app and you can decide whether or not you want to filter on whether or not that relationship is empty. But I would love to filter on whether or not that relationship had any value, not a specific value. And when you're relating to an APP with a thousand items in that you can't necessarily drop in a thousand items into the filter, you know, so, so that's just one small example. And, and, and God bless the people at Podio who are working everyday to, you know, give us a more stable environment. There's, there's, there's really is nothing like it. There's , I have spent an enormous amount of time doing research on every other project management based, anything that's kind of like podio system that's out there and there really isn't anything like it, like all of the systems out there that people like to use things like Asana or Reich or uh , there's a brand new one on the market that's kind of coming up very slowly. It's called Coda. It's got some cool things in it. Uh, you know, monday.com to do with, you know, there's a whole bunch of software systems out there, but the one thing that keeps bringing us back as the ultimate customer customization potential of any system or product that you may wish to build. And that's why we love podio so much when it comes to this product based scenario. With boost, for example, you know, we, we've done over the past, you know, six months to a year, we've worked with a number of property management companies and we've learned a lot as a company who's worked with these companies, we've learned a lot about how these businesses tick, what they actually do on a daily basis, what their core challenges are , um, and, and what they need from a software system. And we've attempted to give them that with boost , like a core solid system that's gonna take up 75, 80, 85% of what a business, what a property management company needs in order to get their job done. But it's not 100% . And the reason is, is because you cannot sell a SAS software that's going to please 100% of the community. It's impossible. It's impossible. So, but the good thing about, you know, and I'm going to say the evil word here, salesforce , I don't like to say that word out loud very often. Uh, but , uh, but you know, salesforce is one of those companies that is, has a huge user base. But every time we talk about is salesforce , everyone's like, I wish I had a field for this or I wish I didn't have to look at this. Um, and that's why we love having conversations about podio with those people. It was like you can get everything that you would want in any SAS system out there and we can remove all those are things you don't care about and then add in all of the things that are, that are, that are , um, you know , uh , relevant to you. Because even if we give 85% of what a property management company needs to them, every company is going to be different. Everyone's going to have a different way of doing things and we can customize each individual system to their individual needs. And there's just nothing like it out there . They're there , you know, there , there's literally nothing like podio on the market, which is why it's such a beautiful, you know, sexy proposal to write these products and , um , and the systems for clients and we, you know, the , the , the proof is in the pudding. Every time we do a new system for a client and they're like, this is everything I asked for. Well, you know, that's because we didn't include anything they didn't ask for. And you don't have to grab an off the shelf system and be looking at fields that you're never going to use for the rest of your life.

Gil Roberts:

Yeah. Especially from a user experience. I think some of those, just having those fields there. Um, and as a , especially as a former, a sales force for , for me, myself, I use it for a number of years over in the financial world. I, it was, it was either you had all these fields and no one knew what to do with them, so people started plugging stuff into it. Uh , people are using them as personal note fields and other things. Uh, that just wasn't inappropriate because, you know, human beings, especially those that are, you know , down on the front lines, they have a different job or not software people , uh, they just see all these fields and, okay, I'm , I guess I'm supposed to do something with all of this, right? Or I just have a need to feel fill it in . And , and then secondly, I, our company, it was financial company so they had some money to actually dump into salesforce development and it was big bucks . I mean we haven't even touched on you . You're talking about the user experience and how much better, which I we totally 100% agree with. We're not even talking about the cost side. Uh, you know, just even a , a seat versus seat basis or even just a , the cost to just build it out. And then, you know , nobody wanted our company was like, oh you want a custom field, just use this other field that was labeled something else. Cause we're not gonna dump in five, $600 an hour just to change fields around it, which is absolutely ridiculous. When you go to podio and you just modify template, add the field. Yeah . It's like,

Andrew Cranston:

or take a field away that nobody's ever going to use or, or rename a field so that it actually provides a little bit of context on what the field is for . Cause you nailed it like it , you know, and I still see situations in SAS systems where it's like custom field one and then everybody who works in the company for the rest of their lives have to be informed and reminded that custom field one is supposed to hold this particular piece of information. But wouldn't it be better if it was just called what it was for, you know? Uh , and that is, that's, that's it. I mean, that's the end. And you mentioned from a cost perspective and doing, you know, obviously having the option of doing , um, you know, custom development of, of, of salesforce . I mean, that's a bit of a unique situation in most cases. And most SAS systems, if you said, hey, I wanted to add a custom field, or I wanted to do some customization of my own personal account, they'd be like, well, sorry, we don't, you know, like it's the software is the software and, and uh, and that's kind of it. And then the only other option on the market would really for you to go to like a developer and build something from absolute scratch, which w which is definitely good because you know, like for those people who are working in high level corporate environments , um, there may be a need for something that's completely white labeled and which doesn't really bother me. I don't know why it bothers most people, but it does bother some people that, you know, podio is not a white label kind of kind of product, but , um, but also like developing a, a podio of your own from scratch will cost you thousands, tens of thousands of dollars. Like you'll be working at it for years and you'll pay an a crazy amount of money. But giving the opportunity to speak with those people for five minutes and say, yeah, you know, podio, you know , can do almost everything you're looking for and everything that it doesn't, it can't do, we'll integrate with another system that does it so that everything's under one roof. I mean , um, and I joke with Jordan all the time back in the back in the old days as it were , uh , you know, which is like two years ago, I know it's old days. Um , uh , you know, when we were talking about different solutions, you know, before, before even Api integration was really on our, on our radar when we were just really sort of doing pure globee flow. Um, and we, we will be talking about , um, you know, this other software like w we need , we have a client who has a need and this need is over here. Um, and then what are we going to do? Okay, well we're going to get the client to use podio and this other software and then we wrap our brain around it after a long time. And then finally, you know what, we're either gonna dump everything in Podio and do it from there and let globiflow do all the logic or try to rebuild it in podio. And I keep joking with Jordan, like I have a big, like I have an imaginary banner hanging over my desk that says in big bold letters, all roads lead to podio. That's kind of how, how I've been, that's my core concept to my core, a mantra that I've been working on over the past , uh , three years. It's just, you know, podio, the Podio, podio and the Podio Api are capable of pretty much anything. What do we need to do? I start from the end and I work my way back and so far it's been, so far it has provided us I'll many opportunities to learn and to grow and we've been working in , um, in, in industries that , uh, you know, we never would have expected to work in, but with a little bit of insight from the client and with our knowledge of what podio is capable of, we've done some pretty cool things and boost is really a conglomeration of a lot of that work. All of our work on communications, this external portal side , um, you know, mobile friendly environments, task management. It's a lot of our core concepts that we've been working on for a lot of , uh , for, you know , the last two years brought together under one roof and it's really exciting to see it kind of all work together.

Gil Roberts:

That's amazing. Well , um, I know we're, we're starting to run at our time here. Is there, is there anything else that you want to share with our listeners and the podio community or, or anything else, a message you'd like to be able to get out there? I think that last message was a good one. Is there anything to add to that maybe?

Andrew Cranston:

Yeah. Well, I think that , um, for those folks who are, you know , speaking specifically to people who are actually in Globiflow , uh , people who are working in global flow on a daily basis and who are using it for their own purposes, my recommendation to them would be you would not believe how easy it is to get to that next level. And there are, you know, if you are not an active member, if you are not, you know , in the globiflow community in the forum or the procfu Forum or, or you know, the , there's a, there's a , a podio community over there in stack overflow as well. If there's many places for you to interact with, people, find solutions, find answers. So, so get into these communities. Uh, and then also if somebody gives you an answer to something that seems a little bit more technical, have the foresight to go learn why rather than just that it works, you know , um, look at the code, look at what people are saying to you and actually, you know, get in there and obviously if you want to move into the next level, you know, go to something like w three schools.com. Learn PHP, learn html and a, and you will unlock the power of even what it just a, a custom variable and globiflow can can provide for you. Um, and uh, and it's, it's, it's not as hard as you think. I guess in short.

Gil Roberts:

That's fantastic advice, get in. Get your hands dirty. Don't be afraid. Yeah, it's really hard to break stuff, honestly with Podio I think, and the way they got a ton of, it's really hard to break stuff. You might blow some rate limits and things like that, but it's not , um, you know, don't be afraid.

Andrew Cranston:

Yeah, I think you're not, you can't truly call yourself a podio developer until you've got into like a thousand action loop and you're losing your mind trying to shut a flow up. I think once you cross that barrier, then you , then you can really call yourself. I thought you have to get past that. Scared those scary points. But you're right. I mean, I have sandboxes upon sandboxes and I, you know, so many prototypes and ideas, just tinkering, just play, just, you know, take the time to actually read and it's , um, it's, it's really gonna pay off. Trust me from my own perspective, I can tell you what's really going to pay off.

Gil Roberts:

That's fantastic. Well, Andrew, thank you so much for taking the time for us and our listeners today , uh, is there any, any , uh, what's the , what's the web link to boost? Where , where if somebody wants to learn about boost or buy booze , where would they go?

Andrew Cranston:

Yeah , so you can find more about it at boostpm.com and a , and there's a contact form there if you want to get in touch with this , but everybody has, everything you'd want to know about us is that at boostpm.com

Gil Roberts:

and then I, I do believe you guys his main from addresses that uh , we are gamechangers.com Right? That's correct. Also. Yep . Okay. And then for the listeners there that are driving around in their car, I'll have those linked down at the bottom of the show notes of this show , uh, that , uh, again, we appreciate your time, Andrew. Uh, if there's anything else, always feel free to reach out. We'd love to have you back on the show here in a few months and learn about boost pm and it's a continued process.

Andrew Cranston:

Sounds good. Thank you guys very much for having me.

Gil Roberts:

Thank you so much for listening to today's episode. I hope you found the interview with Andrew Cranston of value and it sparked your interest to dig into more of the next level tools that are available, either through something like approximate or a custom engine, like, Sassafras, or , uh , just really get yourself in to get your hands dirty on the API. Coming up next week on the podio solutions podcast will be another episode of our mini series solving podio gaps. We're going to try to tackle two gaps on next episode. We are still looking for suggestions. We have a couple in mind that we're going to start working on, but if you have any suggestions, we'd like to hear about them . Hit us up on our Facebook, linkedin, Twitter, or shoot us a podio message or email at podcasts@brickbridgeconsulting.com. Again, thank you for listening to today's episode and we'll catch you next week.